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The effect of exercise-intensity on skeletal muscle stress kinase and insulin protein signaling

Parker, Lewan, Trewin, Adam, Levinger, Itamar, Shaw, Christopher S. and Stepto, Nigel K. 2017, The effect of exercise-intensity on skeletal muscle stress kinase and insulin protein signaling, PLoS one, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0171613.

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Title The effect of exercise-intensity on skeletal muscle stress kinase and insulin protein signaling
Author(s) Parker, Lewan
Trewin, Adam
Levinger, Itamar
Shaw, Christopher S.ORCID iD for Shaw, Christopher S. orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Stepto, Nigel K.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 12
Issue number 2
Article ID e0171613
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-02-09
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary Background: Stress and mitogen activated protein kinase (SAPK) signaling play an important role in glucose homeostasis and the physiological adaptation to exercise. However, the effects of acute high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and sprint interval exercise (SIE) on activation of these signaling pathways are unclear.

Methods: Eight young and recreationally active adults performed a single cycling session of HIIE (5×4 minutes at 75% Wmax), SIE (4 × 30 second Wingate sprints), and continuous moderate-intensity exercise work-matched to HIIE (CMIE; 30 minutes at 50% of Wmax), separated by a minimum of 1 week. Skeletal muscle SAPK and insulin protein signaling were measured immediately, and 3 hours after exercise.

Results: SIE elicited greater skeletal muscle NF-κB p65 phosphorylation immediately after exercise (SIE: ∼40%; HIIE: ∼4%; CMIE; ∼13%; p < 0.05) compared to HIIE and CMIE. AS160Ser588 phosphorylation decreased immediately after HIIE (∼-27%; p < 0.05), and decreased to the greatest extent immediately after SIE (∼-60%; p < 0.05). Skeletal muscle JNK (∼42%; p < 0.05) and p38 MAPK (∼171%; p < 0.05) phosphorylation increased, and skeletal muscle AktSer473 phosphorylation (∼-32%; p < 0.05) decreased, to a similar extent immediately after all exercise protocols. AS160Ser588 phosphorylation was similar to baseline three hours after SIE (∼-12%; p > 0.05), remained lower 3 hours after HIIE (∼-34%; p < 0.05), and decreased 3 hours after CMIE (∼-33%; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Despite consisting of less total work than CMIE and HIIE, SIE proved to be an effective stimulus for the activation of stress protein kinase signaling pathways linked to exercise-mediated adaptation of skeletal muscle. Furthermore, post-exercise AS160Ser588 phosphorylation decreased in an exercise-intensity and post-exercise time-course dependent manner.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0171613
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093754

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Fri, 07 Apr 2017, 11:32:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.