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Problem-solving therapy for adults with diabetic retinopathy and diabetes-specific distress: a pilot randomized controlled trial

Rees, Gwyneth, O'Hare, Fleur, Saeed, Marian, Sudholz, Bronwyn, Sturrock, Bonnie A., Xie, Jing, Speight, Jane and Lamoureux, Ecosse L. 2017, Problem-solving therapy for adults with diabetic retinopathy and diabetes-specific distress: a pilot randomized controlled trial, BMJ open diabetes research and care, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000307.

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Title Problem-solving therapy for adults with diabetic retinopathy and diabetes-specific distress: a pilot randomized controlled trial
Author(s) Rees, Gwyneth
O'Hare, Fleur
Saeed, Marian
Sudholz, Bronwyn
Sturrock, Bonnie A.
Xie, Jing
Speight, JaneORCID iD for Speight, Jane orcid.org/0000-0002-1204-6896
Lamoureux, Ecosse L.
Journal name BMJ open diabetes research and care
Volume number 5
Issue number 1
Article ID e000307
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
Keyword(s) psychological aspects
psychology/behavior
psychosocial depression
retinopathy
Summary OBJECTIVE: To provide preliminary evidence for the impact of problem-solving therapy for diabetes (PST-D) in adults with diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetes distress.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a pilot randomized controlled trial, 40 participants with DR and diabetes distress were allocated to the PST-D or control groups. Diabetes distress (DDS), depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), self-care activities (SDSCA), and HbA1c were assessed at baseline, and 3 and 6-month follow-ups.

RESULTS: At the 6-month follow-up, the PST-D group showed significant improvements relative to the control group, in 'regimen-related distress' (PST-D: -1.3±1.4; control: -0.4±1.1), depressive symptoms (PST-D: -4.3±6.1; control: -0.3±4.6), and HbA1c (PST-D: -1.2%±1.01; control: 0.2%±1.2%) (all p<0.05). In multiple regression analysis, adjusting for baseline values and sociodemographic factors, PST-D was associated with significant improvement in 'regimen-related distress', depressive symptoms, and HbA1c at the 6-month follow-up (p<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: PST-D is a promising intervention for improving psychological outcomes and glycemic control. A fully powered study is required to confirm these findings and examine mechanisms of change in HbA1c.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000307
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920104 Diabetes
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093791

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.