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Parkinson's disease alters multisensory perception: insights from the Rubber Hand Illusion

Ding, Catherine, Palmer, Colin J., Hohwy, Jakob, Youssef, George J., Paton, Bryan, Tsuchiya, Naotsugu, Stout, Julie C. and Thyagarajan, Dominic 2017, Parkinson's disease alters multisensory perception: insights from the Rubber Hand Illusion, Neuropsychologia, vol. 97, pp. 38-45, doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.01.031.

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Title Parkinson's disease alters multisensory perception: insights from the Rubber Hand Illusion
Author(s) Ding, Catherine
Palmer, Colin J.
Hohwy, Jakob
Youssef, George J.ORCID iD for Youssef, George J. orcid.org/0000-0002-6178-4895
Paton, Bryan
Tsuchiya, Naotsugu
Stout, Julie C.
Thyagarajan, Dominic
Journal name Neuropsychologia
Volume number 97
Start page 38
End page 45
Total pages 8
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 0028-3932
1873-3514
Keyword(s) Body ownership
Multisensory perception
Parkinson's disease
Rubber Hand Illusion
Aged
Female
Humans
Illusions
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease
Perceptual Disorders
Proprioception
Touch Perception
Summary BACKGROUND: Manipulation of multisensory integration induces illusory perceptions of body ownership. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by striatal dopamine deficiency, are prone to illusions and hallucinations and have sensory deficits. Dopaminergic treatment also aggravates hallucinations in PD. Whether multisensory integration in body ownership is altered by PD is unexplored. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of dopamine neurotransmission on illusory perceptions of body ownership. METHODS: We studied the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) in 21 PD patients (on- and off-medication) and 21 controls. In this experimental paradigm, synchronous stroking of a rubber hand and the subject's hidden real hand results in the illusory experience of 'feeling' the rubber hand, and proprioceptive mislocalisation of the real hand towards the rubber hand ('proprioceptive drift'). Asynchronous stroking typically attenuates the RHI. RESULTS: The effect of PD on illusory experience depended on the stroking condition (b = -2.15, 95% CI [-3.06, -1.25], p < .0001): patients scored questionnaire items eliciting the RHI experience higher than controls in the illusion-attenuating (asynchronous) condition, but not in the illusion-promoting (synchronous) condition. PD, independent of stroking condition, predicted greater proprioceptive drift (b = 15.05, 95% CI [6.05, 24.05], p = .0022); the longer the disease duration, the greater the proprioceptive drift. However, the RHI did not affect subsequent reaching actions. On-medication patients scored both illusion (critical) and mock (control) questionnaire items higher than when off-medication, an effect that increased with disease severity (log (OR) =.014, 95% CI [.01, .02], p < .0001). CONCLUSION: PD affects illusory perceptions of body ownership in situations that do not typically induce them, implicating dopamine deficit and consequent alterations in cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuitry in multisensory integration. Dopaminergic treatment appears to increase suggestibility generally rather than having a specific effect on own-body illusions, a novel finding with clinical and research implications.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.01.031
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
1109 Neurosciences
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093924

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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