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Stop task after-effects: the extent of slowing during the preparation and execution of movement

Enticott, Peter G., Bradshaw, John L., Bellgrove, Mark A., Upton, Daniel J. and Ogloff, James R.P. 2009, Stop task after-effects: the extent of slowing during the preparation and execution of movement, Experimental psychology, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 247-251, doi: 10.1027/1618-3169.56.4.247.

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Title Stop task after-effects: the extent of slowing during the preparation and execution of movement
Author(s) Enticott, Peter G.ORCID iD for Enticott, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Bradshaw, John L.
Bellgrove, Mark A.
Upton, Daniel J.
Ogloff, James R.P.
Journal name Experimental psychology
Volume number 56
Issue number 4
Start page 247
End page 251
Total pages 5
Publisher Hogrefe & Huber
Place of publication Göttingen, Germany
Publication date 2009-01
ISSN 1618-3169
2190-5142
Keyword(s) stop task
after-effects
motor preparation
repetition priming
control adjustments
Summary In the stop task, response time to the go signal is increased when the immediately preceding trial involves the presentation of a stop signal. A recent explanation suggests that these “after-effects” are due to mechanisms that occur prior to the completion of response selection processes, but it is possible that they instead may reflect a slowed motor response (i.e., deliberate slowing after response selection). The participants completed a novel stop task that allows a differentiation between the time taken to prepare a movement (which incorporates response selection processes) and the time taken to execute a movement (i.e., speed of motor response). If mechanisms underlying stop task after-effects occur prior to the completion of response selection processes, then slowing should only occur during movement preparation. Movement preparation and execution time during go trials were analysed according to the characteristics of the preceding trial. Slowing after a stop trial was found during movement preparation time (regardless of inhibition success on that stop trial), and it further increased during this period when the primary task stimulus was repeated. There was also evidence for general after-effects during movement execution time, but no effect of repetition. These findings support the current theoretical accounts that suggest that repetition-based stop task after-effects are attributable to a mechanism that occurs prior to the completion of response selection processes, and also indicate a possible switch to a more conservative response set (as in signal detection theory terms) that results in deliberate slowing of movement.
Language eng
DOI 10.1027/1618-3169.56.4.247
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
1701 Psychology
1702 Cognitive Science
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2009, Hogrefe & Huber Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30093952

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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