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HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of persons with and without disabilities from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011: differential access to HIV/AIDS information and services

Abimanyi-Ochom, Julie, Mannan, Hasheem, Groce, Nora Ellen and McVeigh, Joanne 2017, HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of persons with and without disabilities from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011: differential access to HIV/AIDS information and services, Plos one, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 1-20, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174877.

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Title HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of persons with and without disabilities from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011: differential access to HIV/AIDS information and services
Author(s) Abimanyi-Ochom, JulieORCID iD for Abimanyi-Ochom, Julie orcid.org/0000-0002-4760-6304
Mannan, Hasheem
Groce, Nora Ellen
McVeigh, Joanne
Journal name Plos one
Volume number 12
Issue number 4
Article ID e0174877
Start page 1
End page 20
Total pages 20
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-04
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Health
Humans
Knowledge
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic
Risk-Taking
Uganda
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
SOUTHERN AFRICA
HEARING PEOPLE
HIV
ZAMBIA
RIGHTS
DEAF
INTERRELATIONSHIP
EXPERIENCES
ADOLESCENTS
INCLUSION
Summary Uganda is among the first to use the Washington Group Short Set of Questions on Disability to identify persons with disabilities in its Demographic and Health Survey. In this paper, we review the HIV Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviour component of the 2011 Ugandan Demographic and Health Survey, analysing a series of questions comparing those with and without disabilities in relation to HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and practices. We found comparable levels of knowledge on HIV/AIDS for those with and those without disabilities in relation to HIV transmission during delivery (93.89%, 93.26%) and through breastfeeding (89.91%, 90.63%), which may reflect increased attention to reaching the community of persons with disabilities. However, several gaps in the knowledge base of persons with disabilities stood out, including misconceptions of risk of HIV infection through mosquito bites and caring for a relative with HIV in own household (34.39%, 29.86%; p<0.001; 91.53%, 89.00%; p = 0.001, respectively). The issue is not just access to appropriate information but also equitable access to HIV/AIDS services and support. Here we found that persons with multiple disabilities were less likely than individuals without disabilities to return to receive results from their most recent HIV test (0.60[0.41–0.87], p<0.05). HIV testing means little if people do not return for follow-up to know their HIV status and, if necessary, to be connected to available services and supports. Additional findings of note were that persons with disabilities reported having a first sexual encounter at a slightly younger age than peers without disabilities; and persons with disabilities also reported having a sexually transmitted disease (STD) within the last 12 months at significantly higher rates than peers without disabilities (1.38[1.18–1.63], p<0.01), despite reporting comparable knowledge of the need for safer sex practices. This analysis is among the first to use HIV/AIDS-related questions from Demographic Health Surveys to provide information about persons with disabilities in Uganda in comparison to those without disabilities. These findings present a more complex and nuanced understanding of persons with disabilities and HIV/AIDS. If persons with disabilities are becoming sexually active earlier, are more likely to have an STD within the preceding 12 month period and are less likely to receive HIV test results, it is important to understand why. Recommendations are also made for the inclusion of disability measures in Uganda’s AIDS Indicator Survey to provide cyclical and systematic data on disability and HIV/AIDS, including HIV prevalence amongst persons with disabilities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0174877
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30094322

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.