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Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practice associated with meditation among patients with melanoma

Russell, Lahiru, Orellana, Liliana, Ugalde, Anna, Milne, Donna, Krishnasamy, Meinir, Chambers, Richard and Livingston, Patricia M. 2018, Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practice associated with meditation among patients with melanoma, Integrative cancer therapies, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 237-247, doi: 10.1177/1534735417699514.

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Title Exploring knowledge, attitudes, and practice associated with meditation among patients with melanoma
Author(s) Russell, Lahiru
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Ugalde, AnnaORCID iD for Ugalde, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-2473-8435
Milne, Donna
Krishnasamy, Meinir
Chambers, Richard
Livingston, Patricia M.ORCID iD for Livingston, Patricia M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6616-3839
Journal name Integrative cancer therapies
Volume number 17
Issue number 2
Start page 237
End page 247
Total pages 11
Publisher SAGE Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-06
ISSN 1534-7354
1552-695X
Keyword(s) Melanoma
Cancer
Meditation
Self-reflection
Perceived stress
Trait mindfulness
Summary Aim: To explore the knowledge, attitudes, and practices associated with meditation among people with melanoma and investigate the relationship between perceived stress, trait mindfulness, and meditation. Factors associated with interest to participate in an online meditation program were also explored.

Methods: A survey-based cross-sectional study of 291 patients attending a melanoma outpatient clinic assessed knowledge of meditation, attitudes toward meditation using Determinants of Meditation Practice Inventory (DMPI), and meditation experience. Perceived stress and trait mindfulness were measured using the Perceived Stressed Scale and Cognitive and Affective Mindfulness Scale, respectively.

Results: Participants who had tried meditation (43%) were likely to be younger, female, and have completed higher education or be employed. Perceived stress score was higher among women, younger participants, and those treated in the past year but did not differ by melanoma stage. Participants reported a good understanding of the potential benefits of meditation, but even among people with meditation experience, common misconceptions prevailed. The main barrier to meditation was a perceived lack of knowledge about meditation . Higher DMPI scores were associated with lower education, moderate to low access to service centers, or living in disadvantaged neighborhoods . Participants practicing meditation that involved self-reflection reported less stress and higher trait mindfulness compared with participants practicing another type of meditation. People interested in participating in an online meditation-based program reported higher perceived stress than those not interested.

Conclusion: A meditation-based intervention teaching self-reflective practices, targeted at people with melanoma, may have the potential to assist them with managing their stress.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/1534735417699514
Field of Research 111299 Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
1104 Complementary And Alternative Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30095104

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.