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The “Walk of shame”: a qualitative study of the influences of negative stereotyping of problem gambling on gambling attitudes and behaviours

Miller, Helen E. and Thomas, Samantha 2017, The “Walk of shame”: a qualitative study of the influences of negative stereotyping of problem gambling on gambling attitudes and behaviours, International journal of mental health and addiction, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1007/s11469-017-9749-8.

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Title The “Walk of shame”: a qualitative study of the influences of negative stereotyping of problem gambling on gambling attitudes and behaviours
Author(s) Miller, Helen E.
Thomas, Samantha
Journal name International journal of mental health and addiction
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2017-03-31
ISSN 1557-1874
1557-1882
Keyword(s) gambling
problem gambling
stigma
personal responsibility
Summary Problem gambling is known to be associated with significant stigma, but there is limited research on the negative stereotypes that underpin this judgement. Understanding the stereotypes that contribute to the stigmatisation of problem gambling may help to identify new approaches to reducing gambling stigma. Using data collected during 100 in-depth qualitative interviews with gamblers in Victoria, Australia, we explored factors which underpin negative stereotypes about people with gambling problems, the influence of negative stereotypes on behaviours and attitudes and differences in attitudes to different gambling products. Participants perceived that people with gambling problems were lacked responsibility and control, as were “lazy”, “stupid” and “greedy.” Electronic gambling machine (EGM) gamblers were particularly stigmatised. Negative stereotypes focusing on personal responsibility led to feelings of guilt and shame in people with gambling problems, as well as increased social isolation, and also impacted on moderate-risk gamblers, who contrasted their own behaviour with a stereotyped idea of a person with a gambling problem. Participants linked stereotyped portrayals of problem gambling to discussions of the gambling industry, which they perceived focused on control and responsibility, and the media, which they perceived emphasised extreme negative consequences from gambling. This study suggests that negative stereotypes focusing on personal responsibility for gambling problems are a factor leading to the stigmatisation of people with gambling problems.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11469-017-9749-8
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Springer Science + Business Media
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30095125

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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