You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

The Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) at the patient-clinician interface: a qualitative study of what patients and clinicians mean by their HLQ scores

Hawkins, Melanie, Gill, Stephen D, Batterham, Roy, Elsworth, Gerald R and Osborne, Richard H 2017, The Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) at the patient-clinician interface: a qualitative study of what patients and clinicians mean by their HLQ scores, BMC health services research, vol. 17, pp. 1-15, doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2254-8.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hawkins-healthliteracy-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 630.42KB 6

Title The Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) at the patient-clinician interface: a qualitative study of what patients and clinicians mean by their HLQ scores
Author(s) Hawkins, MelanieORCID iD for Hawkins, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0001-5704-0490
Gill, Stephen D
Batterham, RoyORCID iD for Batterham, Roy orcid.org/0000-0002-5273-1011
Elsworth, Gerald R
Osborne, Richard HORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 17
Article ID 309
Start page 1
End page 15
Total pages 15
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1472-6963
1472-6963
Keyword(s) HLQ
Health Literacy Questionnaire
Patient centred care
Patient reported outcomes
Validity
Science & technology
Life sciences & biomedicine
Health care sciences & services
Validation
Model
Summary Background
The Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) has nine scales that each measure an aspect of the multidimensional construct of health literacy. All scales have good psychometric properties. However, it is the interpretations of data within contexts that must be proven valid, not just the psychometric properties of a measurement instrument. The purpose of this study was to establish the extent of concordance and discordance between individual patient and clinician interpretations of HLQ data in the context of complex case management.

Methods
Sixteen patients with complex needs completed the HLQ and were interviewed to discuss the reasons for their answers. Also, the clinicians of each of these patients completed the HLQ about their patient, and were interviewed to discuss the reasons for their answers. Thematic analysis of HLQ scores and interview data determined the extent of concordance between patient and clinician HLQ responses, and the reasons for discordance.

Results
Highest concordance (80%) between patient and clinician item-response pairs was seen in Scale 1 and highest discordance (56%) was seen in Scale 6. Four themes were identified to explain discordance: 1) Technical or literal meaning of specific words; 2) Patients’ changing or evolving circumstances; 3) Different expectations and criteria for assigning HLQ scores; and 4) Different perspectives about a patient’s reliance on healthcare providers.

Conclusion
This study shows that the HLQ can act as an adjunct to clinical practice to help clinicians understand a patient’s health literacy challenges and strengths early in a clinical encounter. Importantly, clinicians can use the HLQ to detect differences between their own perspectives about a patient’s health literacy and the patient’s perspective, and to initiate discussion to explore this. Provision of training to better detect these differences may assist clinicians to provide improved care.

The outcomes of this study contribute to the growing body of international validation evidence about the use of the HLQ in different contexts. More specifically, this study has shown that the HLQ has measurement veracity at the patient and clinician level and may support clinicians to understand patients’ health literacy and enable a deeper engagement with healthcare services.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2254-8
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
0807 Library And Information Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30095347

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 18 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 09 May 2017, 15:29:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.