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Infections and cancer: the "fifty shades of immunity" hypothesis

Jacqueline, Camille, Tasiemski, Aurélie, Sorci, Gabriele, Ujvari, Beata, Maachi, Fatima, Missé, Dorothée, Renaud, François, Ewald, Paul, Thomas, Frédéric and Roche, Benjamin 2017, Infections and cancer: the "fifty shades of immunity" hypothesis, BMC Cancer, vol. 17, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12885-017-3234-4.

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Title Infections and cancer: the "fifty shades of immunity" hypothesis
Author(s) Jacqueline, Camille
Tasiemski, Aurélie
Sorci, Gabriele
Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Maachi, Fatima
Missé, Dorothée
Renaud, François
Ewald, Paul
Thomas, Frédéric
Roche, Benjamin
Journal name BMC Cancer
Volume number 17
Article ID 257
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-04
ISSN 1471-2407
Keyword(s) Cancer
Evolution
Immunity
Infection
Personal history of infection
Communicable Disease Control
Communicable Diseases
Humans
Neoplasms
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Oncology
EPSTEIN-BARR-VIRUS
HELICOBACTER-PYLORI
ONCOLYTIC VIROTHERAPY
SCHISTOSOMA-MANSONI
CYTOKINE PATTERNS
TRACT INFECTIONS
KAPOSIS-SARCOMA
BLADDER-CANCER
T-CELL
RISK
Summary Background
Since the beginning of the twentieth century, infection has emerged as a fundamental aspect of cancer causation with a growing number of pathogens recognized as oncogenic. Meanwhile, oncolytic viruses have also attracted considerable interest as possible agents of tumor destruction.

Discussion

Lost in the dichotomy between oncogenic and oncolytic agents, the indirect influence of infectious organisms on carcinogenesis has been largely unexplored. We describe the various ways – from functional aspects to evolutionary considerations such as modernity mismatches – by which infectious organisms could interfere with oncogenic processes through immunity. Finally, we discuss how acknowledging these interactions might impact public health approaches and suggest new guidelines for therapeutic and preventive strategies both at individual and population levels.

Summary
Infectious organisms, that are not oncogenic neither oncolytic, may play a significant role in carcinogenesis, suggesting the need to increase our knowledge about immune interactions between infections and cancer.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3234-4
Field of Research 110707 Innate Immunity
110704 Cellular Immunology
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30095688

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.