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Exploring the permanence of conservation covenants

Hardy, Mathew J, Fitzsimons, James A, Bekessy, Sarah A and Gordon, Ascelin 2017, Exploring the permanence of conservation covenants, Conservation letters, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 221-230, doi: 10.1111/conl.12243.

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Title Exploring the permanence of conservation covenants
Author(s) Hardy, Mathew JORCID iD for Hardy, Mathew J orcid.org/0000-0002-3010-5386
Fitzsimons, James AORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James A orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Bekessy, Sarah A
Gordon, Ascelin
Journal name Conservation letters
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Start page 221
End page 230
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 1755-263X
Keyword(s) Covenants
breach
release
private land
conservation
private protected areas
easements
biodiversity
Summary Conservation on private land is a growing part of international efforts to stem the decline of biodiversity. In many countries, private land conservation policy often supports in perpetuity covenants and easements, which are legally binding agreements used to protect biodiversity on private land by restricting activities that may negatively impact ecological values. With a view to understand the long-term security of these mechanisms, we examined release and breach data from all 13 major covenanting programs across Australia. We report that out of 6,818 multi-party covenants, only 8 had been released, contrasting with approximately 130 of 673 single-party covenants. Breach data was limited, with a minimum of 71 known cases where covenant obligations had not been met. With a focus on private land conservation policy, we use the results from this case study to argue that multi-party covenants appear an enduring conservation mechanism, highlight the important role that effective monitoring and reporting of the permanency of these agreements plays in contributing to their long-term effectiveness, and provide recommendations for organizations seeking to improve their monitoring programs. The collection of breach and release data is important for the continuing improvement of conservation policies and practices for private land.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/conl.12243
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096041

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.