Openly accessible

Human exploitation assisting a threatened species? The case of muttonbirders and Buller's albatross

Waugh, Susan M., Poupart, Timothee A., Miskelly, , Colin M., Stahl, Jean-Claude and Arnould, John P. Y. 2017, Human exploitation assisting a threatened species? The case of muttonbirders and Buller's albatross, PLOS One, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0175458.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
arnould-humanexploitation-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 841.82KB 73

Title Human exploitation assisting a threatened species? The case of muttonbirders and Buller's albatross
Author(s) Waugh, Susan M.
Poupart, Timothee A.
Miskelly, , Colin M.
Stahl, Jean-Claude
Arnould, John P. Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P. Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Journal name PLOS One
Volume number 12
Issue number 4
Article ID e0175458
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher PloS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2017-04
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animal Feed
Animals
Birds
Endangered Species
Humans
New Zealand
Population Dynamics
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
NEW-ZEALAND
PUFFINUS-GRISEUS
SOOTY SHEARWATER
FORAGING STRATEGIES
RAKIURA-MAORI
DISCARDS
SNARES
Summary Albatrosses are flexible and adaptable predators, relying on live prey as well as carrion. Use of predictable food sources and reliance on human-produced resources are well-known trait in long-range feeders like albatrosses and petrels. Breeding Buller’s albatrosses studied at Solander I. (Hautere), New Zealand fed their chicks the remains of sooty shearwater juveniles (tītī in Māori), which are harvested from nearby muttonbirding sites. Evidence of this food type was found at over 10% of nests examined, and 17–40% birds that were fitted with GPS loggers visited muttonbirding sites in this and previous studies. Muttonbirding is a traditional practice that has continued for centuries, with up to 120 tonnes of offal discharged to the sea annually during the present day harvest. It coincides with the energetically-demanding early chick period for the albatrosses. Our finding suggests that the offal may be an important, but overlooked element in the albatross diet. As an important supplementary food for the albatrosses it is likely to have contributed to the 3% per annum growth of their populations since the first comprehensive population surveys in 1969.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0175458
Field of Research 060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Waugh et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096055

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 279 Abstract Views, 74 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 12 May 2017, 14:57:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.