Openly accessible

What mums think matters: a mediating model of maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on preschoolers' actual screen time

Hinkley, Trina, Carson, Valerie, Kalomakaefu, Krystle and Brown, Helen 2017, What mums think matters: a mediating model of maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on preschoolers' actual screen time, Preventive medicine reports, vol. 6, pp. 339-345, doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.04.015.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
hinkley-whatmumsthink-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 588.94KB 8

Title What mums think matters: a mediating model of maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on preschoolers' actual screen time
Author(s) Hinkley, TrinaORCID iD for Hinkley, Trina orcid.org/0000-0003-2742-8579
Carson, Valerie
Kalomakaefu, Krystle
Brown, HelenORCID iD for Brown, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-5460-3654
Journal name Preventive medicine reports
Volume number 6
Start page 339
End page 345
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 2211-3355
Keyword(s) Mediation
Parent
Perceptions
Preschool
Screen time
Wellbeing
Summary Screen time during the preschool years is detrimental to wellbeing. The impact of parental perceptions on preschoolers' screen time is unknown. This paper explores the association between maternal perceptions of the impact of screen time on their preschoolers' wellbeing with their child's screen time and the potential mediating role of their perception of the appropriate amount of screen time. In 2013–2014, mothers of 575 preschoolers (2–5 years; metropolitan Melbourne and online sources) reported: their perceptions of the impact of screen time on 11 aspects of wellbeing, conceptually grouped to physical, social and cognitive well-being; their perceptions of the appropriate amount of screen time for preschoolers; and their child's actual screen time. Regression analyses investigated associations between perceptions and children's screen time. Mediation by perception of the appropriate amount of screen time was examined using indirect effects. Mothers' perceptions of the impact of screen time on social and cognitive wellbeing had a significant indirect effect on children's actual screen time through mothers' perception of the appropriate amount of screen time for their child. Findings illustrate the potential impact of parents' perceptions on their children's behaviors. Although a significant indirect effect was identified, direction of causality cannot be implied. Further exploration of the direction of association to determine causality, and interventions targeting parental perceptions, are warranted.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.04.015
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 0 Not Applicable
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC APP1070571
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096150

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 78 Abstract Views, 10 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 16 May 2017, 14:47:54 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.