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Sleep quality, affect, pain and disability in children with chronic pain: Is affect a mediator or moderator?

Evans, Subhadra, Djilas, Vesna, Seidman, Laura C., Zeltzer, Lonnie K. and Tsao, Jennie C. I. 2017, Sleep quality, affect, pain and disability in children with chronic pain: Is affect a mediator or moderator?, Journal of pain, pp. 1-26, doi: 10.1016/j.jpain.2017.04.007.

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Title Sleep quality, affect, pain and disability in children with chronic pain: Is affect a mediator or moderator?
Author(s) Evans, SubhadraORCID iD for Evans, Subhadra orcid.org/0000-0002-1898-0030
Djilas, Vesna
Seidman, Laura C.
Zeltzer, Lonnie K.
Tsao, Jennie C. I.
Journal name Journal of pain
Start page 1
End page 26
Total pages 26
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-05-04
ISSN 1528-8447
Keyword(s) Key terms: child
affect
chronic pain
sleep
Summary Sleep problems have been identified as a potential antecedent of chronic pain and pain-related disability in pediatric populations. In adult studies, affect has been implicated in these relationships. This study sought to better understand the relationships between sleep quality, negative and positive affect and pain and functioning in children with chronic pain. Participants included 213 children and adolescents (aged 7-17) presenting to a tertiary pain clinic with chronic pain. Children completed questionnaires measuring sleep quality, positive and negative affect, pain intensity, and functional disability. Results indicated that 74% of children reported disordered sleeping and that poor sleep quality was significantly associated with increased pain, disability, negative affect, and decreased positive affect. Our hypotheses were partially supported, with negative affect (but not positive affect) mediating the relationship between poor sleep and increased pain; and both positive and negative affect mediating the relationship between poor sleep and increased functional disability. There was no evidence for affect as a moderator. This study adds to the growing literature demonstrating the impact of poor sleep quality on children's pain and functioning, highlighting the need to develop further longitudinal research to confirm the causal roles of these variables.
Notes In Press
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jpain.2017.04.007
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
11 Medical And Health Sciences
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096233

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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