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Comparisons of the postprandial inflammatory and endotoxaemic responses to mixed meals in young and older individuals: a randomised trial

Milan, Amber M., Pundir, Shikha, Pileggi, Chantal A., Markworth, James F., Lewandowski, Paul A. and Cameron-Smith, David 2017, Comparisons of the postprandial inflammatory and endotoxaemic responses to mixed meals in young and older individuals: a randomised trial, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.3390/nu9040354.

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Title Comparisons of the postprandial inflammatory and endotoxaemic responses to mixed meals in young and older individuals: a randomised trial
Author(s) Milan, Amber M.
Pundir, Shikha
Pileggi, Chantal A.
Markworth, James F.
Lewandowski, Paul A.
Cameron-Smith, David
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Article ID 354
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-04-02
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) ageing
endotoxaemia
high fat meals
inflammation
oxidative stress
Summary Postprandial inflammation and endotoxaemia are determinants of cardiovascular and metabolic disease risk which are amplified by high fat meals. We aimed to examine the determinants of postprandial inflammation and endotoxaemia in older and younger adults following a high fat mixed meal. In a randomised cross-over trial, healthy participants aged 20-25 and 60-75 years (n = 15/group) consumed a high-fat breakfast and a low-fat breakfast. Plasma taken at baseline and post-meal for 5 h was analysed for circulating endotoxin, cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), and inflammatory gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Older subjects had lower baseline PBMC expression of Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX-1) but greater insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and circulating MCP-1 compared to younger subjects. After either meal, there were no age differences in plasma, chylomicron endotoxin, or plasma LBP concentrations, nor in inflammatory cytokine gene and protein expression (MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α). Unlike younger participants, the older group had decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD)-2 expression after the meals. After a high-fat meal, older adults have no increased inflammatory or endotoxin response, but an altered oxidative stress gene response compared with younger adults. Healthy older adults, without apparent metabolic dysfunction, have a comparable postprandial inflammatory and endotoxaemia response to younger adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9040354
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096264

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.