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Social connection and exclusion of Australian women with no children during midlife

Turnbull, Beth, Graham, Melissa L and Taket, Ann R 2016, Social connection and exclusion of Australian women with no children during midlife, Journal of social inclusion, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 65-85.

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Title Social connection and exclusion of Australian women with no children during midlife
Author(s) Turnbull, Beth
Graham, Melissa LORCID iD for Graham, Melissa L orcid.org/0000-0002-0927-0002
Taket, Ann RORCID iD for Taket, Ann R orcid.org/0000-0002-0971-5884
Journal name Journal of social inclusion
Volume number 7
Issue number 2
Start page 65
End page 85
Total pages 21
Publisher Griffith University ePress
Place of publication Nathan, Qld.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1836-8808
Keyword(s) childlessness
voluntary
circumstantial
involuntary
social exclusion
stigma
Summary Evidence indicates women with no children can experience pronatalism-driven stereotyping, stigmatisation and exclusion. This exploratory cross-sectional study described the social connection and exclusion of Australian women with no children during midlife (defined as aged 45 to 64 years). A total of 294 Australian midlife women with no children completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Data were collected on indicators of exclusion in the social, civic, service and economicdomains of life, and participants’ self-reported perceptions of being stereotyped, stigmatised and excluded because they have no children. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and, for differences between involuntarily childless, circumstantially childless and voluntarily childless women: One Way ANOVAs for normally distributed continuous data, and Kruskal Wallis Analyses of Ranks and Chi Square Tests for Independence for categorical data and non-normally distributedcontinuous data. The findings indicate midlife women feel negatively stereotyped because they have no children. The extent and quality of midlife women’s resources and participation vary between and within the domains of life. However, midlife women reported feeling more excluded because they have no children in the social and civic domains than the service and economic domains. There are few differences between typologies of women with no children. Given that social exclusion is a key social determinant of health and wellbeing, it is essential to ensure all women have opportunities for connection in all domains of life inAustralian society regardless of their motherhood status, by challenging pronatalism at all levels of society.
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
1608 Sociology
1607 Social Work
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096799

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.