You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Fractures in indigenous compared to non-indigenous populations: a systematic review of rates and aetiology

Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L., Vogrin, Sara, Leslie, William D., Kinsella, Rita, Toombs, Maree, Duque, Gustavo, Hosking, Sarah M, Holloway, Kara L., Doolan, Brianna J., Williams, Lana J., Page, Richard S., Pasco, Julie A. and Quirk, Shae E. 2017, Fractures in indigenous compared to non-indigenous populations: a systematic review of rates and aetiology, Bone Reports, vol. 6, pp. 145-158, doi: 10.1016/j.bonr.2017.04.003.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
page-fracturesinindigenouscompared-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 446.99KB 5

Title Fractures in indigenous compared to non-indigenous populations: a systematic review of rates and aetiology
Author(s) Brennan-Olsen, Sharon L.
Vogrin, Sara
Leslie, William D.
Kinsella, Rita
Toombs, Maree
Duque, Gustavo
Hosking, Sarah M
Holloway, Kara L.ORCID iD for Holloway, Kara L. orcid.org/0000-0001-5064-2990
Doolan, Brianna J.
Williams, Lana J.ORCID iD for Williams, Lana J. orcid.org/0000-0002-1377-1272
Page, Richard S.ORCID iD for Page, Richard S. orcid.org/0000-0002-2225-7144
Pasco, Julie A.ORCID iD for Pasco, Julie A. orcid.org/0000-0002-8968-4714
Quirk, Shae E.
Journal name Bone Reports
Volume number 6
Start page 145
End page 158
Total pages 14
Publisher Elsevier B.V.
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 2352-1872
Keyword(s) fracture
incidence
indigenous peoples
risk factors
systematic review
Summary Background
Compared to non-indigenous populations, indigenous populations experience disproportionately greater morbidity, and a reduced life expectancy; however, conflicting data exist regarding whether a higher risk of fracture is experienced by either population. We systematically evaluate evidence for whether differences in fracture rates at any skeletal site exist between indigenous and non-indigenous populations of any age, and to identify potential risk factors that might explain these differences.

Methods

On 31 August 2016 we conducted a comprehensive computer-aided search of peer-reviewed literature without date limits. We searched PubMed, OVID, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and reference lists of relevant publications. The protocol for this systematic review is registered in PROSPERO, the International Prospective Register of systematic reviews (CRD42016043215). Using the World Health Organization reference population as standard, hip fracture incidence rates were re-standardized for comparability between countries.

Results

Our search yielded 3227 articles; 283 potentially eligible articles were cross-referenced against predetermined criteria, leaving 27 articles for final inclusion. Differences in hip fracture rates appeared as continent-specific, with lower rates observed for indigenous persons in all countries except for Canada and Australia where the opposite was observed. Indigenous persons consistently had higher rates of trauma-related fractures; the highest were observed in Australia where craniofacial fracture rates were 22-times greater for indigenous compared to non-indigenous women. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical risk factors, approximately a three-fold greater risk of osteoporotic fracture and five-fold greater risk of craniofacial fractures was observed for indigenous compared to non-indigenous persons; diabetes, substance abuse, comorbidity, lower income, locality, and fracture history were independently associated with an increased risk of fracture.

Conclusions

The observed paucity of data and suggestion of continent-specific differences indicate an urgent need for further research regarding indigenous status and fracture epidemiology and aetiology. Our findings also have implications for communities, governments and healthcare professionals to enhance the prevention of trauma-related fractures in indigenous persons, and an increased focus on modifiable lifestyle behaviours to prevent osteoporotic fractures in all populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.bonr.2017.04.003
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30096906

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 21 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 19 Oct 2017, 09:01:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.