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Reducing occupational sitting: workers' perspectives on participation in a multi-component intervention

Hadgraft, Nyssa T., Willenberg, Lisa, LaMontagne, Anthony D., Malkoski, Keti, Dunstan, David W., Healy, Genevieve N., Moodie, Marj, Eakin, Elizabeth G., Owen, Neville and Lawler, Sheleigh P. 2017, Reducing occupational sitting: workers' perspectives on participation in a multi-component intervention, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12966-017-0530-y.

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Title Reducing occupational sitting: workers' perspectives on participation in a multi-component intervention
Author(s) Hadgraft, Nyssa T.
Willenberg, Lisa
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Malkoski, Keti
Dunstan, David W.
Healy, Genevieve N.
Moodie, MarjORCID iD for Moodie, Marj orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Eakin, Elizabeth G.
Owen, Neville
Lawler, Sheleigh P.
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Article ID 73
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-05
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Intervention
Qualitative
Sedentary behaviour
Sitting
Workplace
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
SIT-STAND WORKSTATIONS
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
SEDENTARY OFFICE WORKERS
ADJUSTABLE WORKSTATIONS
TIME
METAANALYSIS
AUSTRALIA
ADULTS
DESKS
Summary Background
Office workers spend much of their time sitting, which is now understood to be a risk factor for several chronic diseases. This qualitative study examined participants’ perspectives following their involvement in a cluster randomised controlled trial of a multi-component intervention targeting prolonged workplace sitting (Stand Up Victoria). The intervention incorporated a sit-stand workstation, individual health coaching and organisational support strategies. The aim of the study was to explore the acceptability of the intervention, barriers and facilitators to reducing workplace sitting, and perceived effects of the intervention on workplace culture, productivity and health-related outcomes.

Methods
Semi-structured interviews (n = 21 participants) and two focus groups (n = 7) were conducted with intervention participants at the conclusion of the 12 month trial and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Questions covered intervention acceptability, overall impact, barriers and facilitators to reducing workplace sitting, and perceived impact on productivity and workplace culture.

Results
Overall, participants had positive intervention experiences, perceiving that reductions in workplace sitting were associated with improved health and well-being with limited negative impact on work performance. While sit-stand workstations appeared to be the primary drivers of change, workstation design and limited suitability of standing for some job tasks and situations were perceived as barriers to their use. Social support from team leaders and other participants was perceived to facilitate behavioural changes and a shift in norms towards increased acceptance of standing in the workplace.

Conclusions
Multi-component interventions to reduce workplace sitting, incorporating sit-stand workstations, are acceptable and feasible; however, supportive social and environmental conditions are required to support participant engagement. Best practice approaches to reduce workplace sitting should address the multiple levels of influence on behaviour, including factors that may act as barriers to behavioural change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0530-y
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30097115

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.