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Male suicide among construction workers in Australia: a qualitative analysis of the major stressors precipitating death

Milner, Allison, Maheen, Humaira, Currier, Dianne and LaMontagne, Anthony D. 2017, Male suicide among construction workers in Australia: a qualitative analysis of the major stressors precipitating death, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4500-8.

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Title Male suicide among construction workers in Australia: a qualitative analysis of the major stressors precipitating death
Author(s) Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Maheen, Humaira
Currier, Dianne
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 584
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Australia
Job stress
Life stressor
Male construction workers
Suicide
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
GENDER-ROLE-CONFLICT
PSYCHOLOGICAL AUTOPSY
HELP-SEEKING
DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
COMPLETED SUICIDE
MEN
RISK
IMPACT
ENVIRONMENT
HEALTH
Summary Background
Suicide rates among those employed in male-dominated professions such as construction are elevated compared to other occupational groups. Thus far, past research has been mainly quantitative and has been unable to identify the complex range of risk and protective factors that surround these suicides.

Methods

We used a national coronial database to qualitatively study work and non-work related influences on male suicide occurring in construction workers in Australia. We randomly selected 34 cases according to specific sampling framework. Thematic analysis was used to develop a coding structure on the basis of pre-existing theories in job stress research.

Results

The following themes were established on the basis of mutual consensus: mental health issues prior to death, transient working experiences (i.e., the inability to obtain steady employment), workplace injury and chronic illness, work colleagues as a source of social support, financial and legal problems, relationship breakdown and child custody issues, and substance abuse.

Conclusion

Work and non-work factors were often interrelated pressures prior to death. Suicide prevention for construction workers needs to take a systematic approach, addressing work-level factors as well as helping those at-risk of suicide
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4500-8
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
111714 Mental Health
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920505 Occupational Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30097310

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.