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Change in use of sleep medications after gastric bypass surgery or intensive lifestyle treatment in adults with obesity

Ng, Winda L., Peeters, Anna, Näslund, Iingmar, Ottosson, Johan, Johansson, Kari, Marcus, Claude, Shaw, Jonathan E., Bruze, Gustaf, Sundström, Johan and Neovius, Martin 2017, Change in use of sleep medications after gastric bypass surgery or intensive lifestyle treatment in adults with obesity, Obesity, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 1451-1459, doi: 10.1002/oby.21908.

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Title Change in use of sleep medications after gastric bypass surgery or intensive lifestyle treatment in adults with obesity
Author(s) Ng, Winda L.
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Näslund, Iingmar
Ottosson, Johan
Johansson, Kari
Marcus, Claude
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Bruze, Gustaf
Sundström, Johan
Neovius, Martin
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 25
Issue number 8
Start page 1451
End page 1459
Total pages 9
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08
ISSN 1930-739X
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Nutrition & Dietetics
Summary Objective
To examine the change in use of hypnotics and/or sedatives after gastric bypass surgery or intensive lifestyle modification in adults with obesity.

Methods

Adults with obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery or initiated intensive lifestyle modification between 2007 and 2012 were identified through the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry and a Swedish commercial weight loss database. The two cohorts were matched on BMI, age, sex, education, history of hypnotics and/or sedatives use, and treatment year (surgery n = 20,626; lifestyle n = 11,973; 77% women, mean age 41 years, mean BMI 41 kg/m2). The proportion of participants with filled hypnotics and/or sedatives prescriptions was compared yearly for 3 years.

Results
In the matched treatment cohorts, 4% had filled prescriptions for hypnotics and/or sedatives during the year before treatment. At 1 year follow-up, following an average weight loss of 37 kg and 18 kg in the surgery and intensive lifestyle cohorts, respectively, this proportion had increased to 7% in the surgery cohort but remained at 4% in the intensive lifestyle cohort (risk ratio 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.1); at 2 years, the proportion had increased to 11% versus 5% (risk ratio 2.0; 95% CI: 1.7-2.4); and at 3 years, it had increased to 14% versus 6% (risk ratio 2.2; 95% CI: 1.9-2.6).

Conclusions
Gastric bypass surgery was associated with increased use of hypnotics and/or sedatives compared with intensive lifestyle modification.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/oby.21908
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30097740

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.