Openly accessible

Socio-economic position and suicidal ideation in men

Pirkis, Jane, Currier, Dianne, Butterworth, Peter, Milner, Allison, Kavanagh, Anne, Tibble, Holly, Robinson, Jo and Spittal, Matthew J. 2017, Socio-economic position and suicidal ideation in men, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3390/ijerph14040365.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
milner-socioeconomic-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 784.40KB 8

Title Socio-economic position and suicidal ideation in men
Author(s) Pirkis, Jane
Currier, Dianne
Butterworth, Peter
Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Kavanagh, Anne
Tibble, Holly
Robinson, Jo
Spittal, Matthew J.
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 14
Issue number 4
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-03
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) disadvantage
socio-economic position
suicidal ideation
Summary People in low socio-economic positions are over-represented in suicide statistics and are at heightened risk for non-fatal suicidal thoughts and behaviours. Few studies have tried to tease out the relationship between individual-level and area-level socio-economic position, however. We used data from Ten to Men (the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health) to investigate the relationship between individual-level and area-level socio-economic position and suicidal thinking in 12,090 men. We used a measure of unemployment/employment and occupational skill level as our individual-level indicator of socio-economic position. We used the Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (a composite multidimensional construct created by the Australian Bureau of Statistics that combines information from a range of area-level variables, including the prevalence of unemployment and employment in low skilled occupations) as our area-level indicator. We assessed suicidal thinking using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). We found that even after controlling for common predictors of suicidal thinking; low individual-level and area-level socio-economic position heightened risk. Individual-level socio-economic position appeared to exert the greater influence of the two; however. There is an onus on policy makers and planners from within and outside the mental health sector to take individual- and area-level socio-economic position into account when they are developing strategic initiatives.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14040365
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30097954

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 30 Abstract Views, 9 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 17 Jul 2017, 14:47:40 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.