You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Protocol for a systematic review of telephone delivered psychosocial interventions on relapse prevention, adherence to psychiatric medication and health risk behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder

Beck, Alison K., Baker, Amanda, Turner, Alyna, Haddock, Gillian, Kelly, Peter J., Berry, Katherine and Bucci, Sandra 2015, Protocol for a systematic review of telephone delivered psychosocial interventions on relapse prevention, adherence to psychiatric medication and health risk behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder, BMJ open, vol. 5, no. 12, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009985.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
turner-protocolforsystematic-2015.pdf Published version application/pdf 726.48KB 1

Title Protocol for a systematic review of telephone delivered psychosocial interventions on relapse prevention, adherence to psychiatric medication and health risk behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder
Author(s) Beck, Alison K.
Baker, Amanda
Turner, AlynaORCID iD for Turner, Alyna orcid.org/0000-0001-7389-2546
Haddock, Gillian
Kelly, Peter J.
Berry, Katherine
Bucci, Sandra
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 5
Issue number 12
Article ID e009985
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher BMJ Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) cardiovascular risk
medication compliance
psychosocial telephone intervention
psychotic disorder
relapse
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents
Clinical Protocols
Combined Modality Therapy
Humans
Medication Adherence
Psychotherapy
Psychotic Disorders
Recurrence
Risk-Taking
Secondary Prevention
Telemedicine
Telephone
Summary Introduction The mental and physical health of individuals with a psychotic illness are typically poor. When adhered to, medication can reduce relapse. However, despite adherence, relapse remains common and functional outcomes often remain compromised. Compliance is also typically low. Cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality is also elevated, along with several important modifiable health risk behaviours. Access to psychosocial interventions is therefore important, but currently limited. Telephone delivered interventions represent a promising solution, although further clarity is needed. Accordingly, we aim to provide an overview and critical analysis of the current state of evidence for telephone delivered psychosocial interventions targeting key health priorities in adults with a psychotic disorder, including (1) relapse, (2) adherence to psychiatric medication and/or (3) modifiable cardiovascular health risk behaviours.

Methods and analysis Our methods are informed by published guidelines. The review is registered and any protocol amendments will be tracked. Ten electronic peer-reviewed and four grey literature databases have been identified. Preliminary searches have been conducted for literature on psychosocial telephone interventions targeting relapse, medication adherence and/or health risk behaviours in adults with a psychotic disorder. Articles classified as ‘evaluation’ will be assessed against standardised criteria and checked by an independent assessor. The searches will be re-run just before final analyses and further studies retrieved for inclusion. A narrative synthesis will be reported, structured around intervention type and content, population characteristics and outcomes. Where possible, ‘summary of findings’ tables will be generated for each comparison. For the primary outcome of each trial, when data are available, we will calculate a risk ratio and its 95% CI (dichotomous outcomes) and/or effect size according to Cohen's formula (continuous outcomes).

Ethics and dissemination No ethical issues are foreseen. Findings will be disseminated widely to clinicians and researchers via journal publication and conference presentation(s).
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009985
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30097965

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 21 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 17 Jul 2017, 14:50:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.