Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet

Vandevijvere, Stefanie, Sagar, Karuna, Kelly, Bridget and Swinburn, Boyd 2017, Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet, New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 130, no. 1450, pp. 32-43.

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Title Unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet
Author(s) Vandevijvere, Stefanie
Sagar, Karuna
Kelly, Bridget
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name New Zealand Medical Journal
Volume number 130
Issue number 1450
Start page 32
End page 43
Total pages 12
Publisher New Zealand Medical Association
Place of publication Wellington, New Zealand
Publication date 2017-02-17
ISSN 0028-8446
1175-8716
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Advertising as Topic
Carbonated Beverages
Child
Child, Preschool
Food
Humans
Internet
Marketing
Pediatric Obesity
Snacks
Summary AIM: To assess the extent and nature of unhealthy food marketing to New Zealand children and adolescents through the internet. METHODS: Internet traffic data for January 2014 was purchased from AC Nielsen to identify the most popular websites (n=110) among children and adolescents aged 6-17 years. In addition, websites (n=70) of food and beverage brands most frequently marketed to children through television, sports, magazines and Facebook were included. Marketing techniques and features on those websites were analysed. RESULTS: The extent of food marketing on popular non-food websites was low. A wide range of marketing techniques and features was, however, identified on food brand websites, including advercation (87%), viral marketing (64%), cookies (54%), free downloadable items (43%), promotional characters (39%), designated children's sections (19%) and advergaming (13%). Most techniques appeared more frequently on websites specifically targeting children and adolescents, than on other websites targeting the general public. CONCLUSION: Compared to traditional media, the internet allows food marketers to use engaging techniques to directly interact with children. While the range of marketing techniques and features identified on food brand websites was extensive, the most popular websites among children and adolescents were non-food related, and the extent of food marketing on those websites was found to be low. Additional assessment of food marketing to children through social and other digital media is recommended.
Language eng
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, NZMA
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30099428

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Health and Social Development
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