You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to dietary salt among adults in the state of Victoria, Australia 2015

Grimes, Carley A., Kelley, Sarah-Jane, Stanley, Sonya, Bolam, Bruce, Webster, Jacqui, Khokhar, Durreajam and Nowson, Caryl A. 2017, Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to dietary salt among adults in the state of Victoria, Australia 2015, BMC public health, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4451-0.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
khokhar-knowledgeattitudes-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.48MB 8

Title Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to dietary salt among adults in the state of Victoria, Australia 2015
Author(s) Grimes, Carley A.ORCID iD for Grimes, Carley A. orcid.org/0000-0002-9123-1888
Kelley, Sarah-Jane
Stanley, Sonya
Bolam, Bruce
Webster, Jacqui
Khokhar, Durreajam
Nowson, Caryl A.ORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl A. orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Issue number 1
Article ID 532
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-05-30
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) Attitude
Australia
Behaviour
Consumer
Dietary salt
Dietary sodium
Knowledge
Summary Background
Information on consumer’s knowledge, attitudes and behaviours (KABs) related to salt can be used to inform awareness and education campaigns and serve as a baseline measure to monitor changes in KABs over time. The aim of this study was to determine KABs related to salt intake among Victorian adults.

Methods
Cross-sectional survey conducted in Victorian adults aged 18–65 years. Participants were recruited from shopping centres located in Melbourne and Geelong and via online methods (Facebook and Consumer Research Panel) to complete an online survey assessing KABs related to dietary salt. Descriptive statistics (mean (SD) or n (%)) were used to report survey findings.

Results
A total of 2398 participants provided a valid survey (mean age 43 years (SD 13), 57% female). The majority (80%) were born in Australia and 63% were the main household grocery shopper. The majority (89%) were aware of the health risks associated with a high salt intake. Eighty three percent believed that Australians eat too much salt. Three quarters (75%) correctly identified salt from processed foods as being the main source of salt in the diet. Less than a third (29%) of participants believed their own individual salt intake exceeded dietary recommendations and only 28% could correctly identify the maximum recommended daily intake for salt. Just under half (46%) of participants were concerned about the amount of salt in food. Almost two thirds (61%) of participants believed that there should be laws which limit the amount of salt added to manufactured foods and 58% agreed that it was difficult to find lower salt options when eating out.

Conclusions
The findings of this study serve as a baseline assessment of KABs related to salt intake in Victorian adults and can be used to assess changes in salt related KABs over time. Public concern about salt is low as many people remain unaware of their own salt intake. An increased awareness of the excessive amount of salt consumed and increased availability of lower salt foods are likely to reduce population salt intake.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4451-0
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30099557

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 24 Abstract Views, 8 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 26 Jul 2017, 11:55:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.