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Fat taste sensitivity is associated with short-term and habitual fat intake

Costanzo, Andrew, Orellana, Liliana, Nowson, Caryl, Duesing, Konsta and Keast, Russell 2017, Fat taste sensitivity is associated with short-term and habitual fat intake, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 7, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/nu9070781.

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Title Fat taste sensitivity is associated with short-term and habitual fat intake
Author(s) Costanzo, Andrew
Orellana, LilianaORCID iD for Orellana, Liliana orcid.org/0000-0003-3736-4337
Nowson, CarylORCID iD for Nowson, Caryl orcid.org/0000-0001-6586-7965
Duesing, Konsta
Keast, RussellORCID iD for Keast, Russell orcid.org/0000-0003-2147-7687
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 7
Article ID 781
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-07-20
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) BMI
fat intake
fat taste
liking
sensitivity
taste thresholds
women
Summary Evidence suggests individuals less sensitive to fat taste (high fat taste thresholds (FTT)) may be overweight or obese and consume greater amounts of dietary fat than more sensitive individuals. The aims of this study were to assess associations between FTT, anthropometric measurements, fat intake, and liking of fatty foods. FTT was assessed in 69 Australian females (mean age 41.3 (15.6) (SD) years and mean body mass index 26.3 (5.7) kg/m²) by a 3-alternate forced choice methodology and transformed to an ordinal scale (FT rank). Food liking was assessed by hedonic ratings of high-fat and reduced-fat foods, and a 24-h food recall and food frequency questionnaire was completed. Linear mixed regression models were fitted. FT rank was associated with dietary % energy from fat ( β ^ = 0.110 [95% CI: 0.003, 0.216]), % energy from carbohydrate ( β ^ = -0.112 [-0.188, -0.035]), and frequency of consumption of foods per day from food groups: high-fat dairy ( β ^ = 1.091 [0.106, 2.242]), meat & meat alternatives ( β ^ = 0.669 [0.168, 1.170]), and grain & cereals ( β ^ = 0.771 [0.212, 1.329]) (adjusted for energy and age). There were no associations between FT rank and anthropometric measurements or hedonic ratings. Therefore, fat taste sensitivity appears to be associated with short-term fat intake, but not body size in this group of females.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9070781
Field of Research 111104 Public Nutrition Intervention
1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30099576

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.