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Perceived health benefits and willingness to pay for parks by park users: quantitative and qualitative research

Henderson-Wilson, Claire, Sia, Kah-Ling, Veitch, Jenny, Staiger, Petra K., Davidson, Penny and Nicholls, Peter 2017, Perceived health benefits and willingness to pay for parks by park users: quantitative and qualitative research, International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 1-18, doi: 10.3390/ijerph14050529.

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Title Perceived health benefits and willingness to pay for parks by park users: quantitative and qualitative research
Author(s) Henderson-Wilson, ClaireORCID iD for Henderson-Wilson, Claire orcid.org/0000-0001-7826-9788
Sia, Kah-Ling
Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Staiger, Petra K.ORCID iD for Staiger, Petra K. orcid.org/0000-0002-6968-5015
Davidson, Penny
Nicholls, Peter
Journal name International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume number 14
Issue number 5
Article ID 529
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-05-15
ISSN 1660-4601
Keyword(s) economic value
health
parks
wellbeing
Summary Whilst a growing body of evidence demonstrates people derive a range of health and wellbeing benefits from visiting parks, only a limited number of attempts have been made to provide a complementary economic assessment of parks. The aim of this exploratory study was to directly estimate the perceived health and wellbeing benefits attained from parks and the economic value assigned to parks by park users in Victoria, Australia. The research employed a mixed methods approach (survey and interviews) to collect primary data from a selection of 140 park users: 100 from two metropolitan parks in Melbourne and 40 from a park on the urban fringe of Melbourne, Victoria. Our findings suggest that park users derive a range of perceived physical, mental/spiritual, and social health benefits, but park use was predominantly associated with physical health benefits. Overall, our exploratory study findings suggest that park users are willing to pay for parks, as they highly value them as places for exercising, socialising, and relaxing. Importantly, most people would miss parks if they did not exist. The findings aim to provide park managers, public health advocates, and urban policy makers with evidence about the perceived health and wellbeing benefits of park usage and the economic value park visitors place on parks.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14050529
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30099759

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.