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Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study

Iedema, Rick, Allen, Suellen, Britton, Kate, Piper, Donella, Baker, Andrew, Grbich, Carol, Allan, Alfred, Jones, Liz, Tuckett, Anthony, Williams, Allison, Manias, Elizabeth and Gallagher, Thomas H. 2011, Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study, BMJ, vol. 343, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmj.d4423.

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Title Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study
Author(s) Iedema, Rick
Allen, Suellen
Britton, Kate
Piper, Donella
Baker, Andrew
Grbich, Carol
Allan, Alfred
Jones, Liz
Tuckett, Anthony
Williams, Allison
Manias, ElizabethORCID iD for Manias, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-3747-0087
Gallagher, Thomas H.
Journal name BMJ
Volume number 343
Article ID d4423
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-07
ISSN 1756-1833
Keyword(s) Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Australia
Child
Child, Preschool
Compensation and Redress
Data Collection
Disclosure
Family
Humans
Infant
Medical Errors
Middle Aged
Patient Satisfaction
Perception
Personal Satisfaction
Physician-Patient Relations
Social Support
Young Adult
Summary Objectives To investigate patients’ and family members’ perceptions and experiences of disclosure of healthcare incidents and to derive principles of effective disclosure.

Design
Retrospective qualitative study based on 100 semi-structured, in depth interviews with patients and family members.

Setting Nationwide multisite survey across Australia.

Participants
39 patients and 80 family members who were involved in high severity healthcare incidents (leading to death, permanent disability, or long term harm) and incident disclosure. Recruitment was via national newspapers (43%), health services where the incidents occurred (28%), two internet marketing companies (27%), and consumer organisations (2%).

Main outcome measures Participants’ recurrent experiences and concerns expressed in interviews.

Results Most patients and family members felt that the health service incident disclosure rarely met their needs and expectations. They expected better preparation for incident disclosure, more shared dialogue about what went wrong, more follow-up support, input into when the time was ripe for closure, and more information about subsequent improvement in process. This analysis provided the basis for the formulation of a set of principles of effective incident disclosure.

Conclusions
Despite growing prominence of open disclosure, discussion about healthcare incidents still falls short of patient and family member expectations. Healthcare organisations and providers should strengthen their efforts to meet patients’ (and family members’) needs and expectations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmj.d4423
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30100077

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Nursing and Midwifery
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.