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The association between Western and Prudent dietary patterns and fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and normal glucose metabolism in older Australian adults

Walsh, Erin I., Jacka, Felice N., Butterworth, Peter, Anstey, Kaarin J. and Cherbuin, Nicolas 2017, The association between Western and Prudent dietary patterns and fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and normal glucose metabolism in older Australian adults, Heliyon, vol. 3, no. 6, doi: 10.1016/j.heliyon.2017.e00315.

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Title The association between Western and Prudent dietary patterns and fasting blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes and normal glucose metabolism in older Australian adults
Author(s) Walsh, Erin I.
Jacka, Felice N.ORCID iD for Jacka, Felice N. orcid.org/0000-0002-9825-0328
Butterworth, Peter
Anstey, Kaarin J.
Cherbuin, Nicolas
Journal name Heliyon
Volume number 3
Issue number 6
Article ID e00315
Total pages 17
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 2405-8440
Keyword(s) health sciences
metabolism
nutrition
Summary High blood glucose and type 2 diabetes are associated with a range of adverse health and cognitive outcomes. One factor that contributes to high blood glucose and type 2 diabetes is dietary intake. This study investigated the relationship between dietary patterns, fasting blood glucose and diabetes status in a sample of 209 participants aged 60–65. Blood plasma glucose was measured from venous blood samples. Individual Prudent and Western dietary patterns were estimated from a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. The relationship between dietary patterns, diabetes, and blood glucose was assessed via general linear model analyses controlling for age, sex, height, and total caloric intake. Results indicated that there was no association between Prudent diet and fasting blood glucose levels, or type 2 diabetes. In contrast, an individual in the upper tertile for Western dietary score had a significantly higher risk of having diabetes than an individual in the lower tertile for Western dietary score. However, there was no significant association between Western diet and fasting blood glucose. Western diet may be associated with type 2 diabetes through mechanisms beyond impacting blood plasma glucose directly. The fact that the association between Western diet and type 2 diabetes remained even when total caloric intake was controlled for highlights the need for policy and population health interventions targeting the reduction of unhealthy food consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.heliyon.2017.e00315
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30100111

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.