Development of a theory-informed implementation intervention to improve the triage, treatment and transfer of stroke patients in emergency departments using the theoretical domains framework (TDF): the T(3) trial

Craig, Louise E, Taylor, Natalie, Grimley, Rohan, Cadilhac, Dominique A, McInnes, Elizabeth, Phillips, Rosemary, Dale, Simeon, O'Connor, Denise, Levi, Chris, Fitzgerald, Mark, Considine, Julie, Grimshaw, Jeremy M, Gerraty, Richard, Cheung, N Wah, Ward, Jeanette and Middleton, Sandy 2017, Development of a theory-informed implementation intervention to improve the triage, treatment and transfer of stroke patients in emergency departments using the theoretical domains framework (TDF): the T(3) trial, Implementation science, vol. 12, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1186/s13012-017-0616-6.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Development of a theory-informed implementation intervention to improve the triage, treatment and transfer of stroke patients in emergency departments using the theoretical domains framework (TDF): the T(3) trial
Author(s) Craig, Louise E
Taylor, Natalie
Grimley, Rohan
Cadilhac, Dominique A
McInnes, Elizabeth
Phillips, Rosemary
Dale, Simeon
O'Connor, Denise
Levi, Chris
Fitzgerald, Mark
Considine, JulieORCID iD for Considine, Julie orcid.org/0000-0003-3801-2456
Grimshaw, Jeremy M
Gerraty, Richard
Cheung, N Wah
Ward, Jeanette
Middleton, Sandy
Journal name Implementation science
Volume number 12
Article ID 88
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1748-5908
Keyword(s) behaviour change techniques
implementation intervention
theoretical domains framework
science and technology
life sciences and biomedicine
health care sciences
Summary BACKGROUND: Theoretical frameworks and models based on behaviour change theories are increasingly used in the development of implementation interventions. Development of an implementation intervention is often based on the available evidence base and practical issues, i.e. feasibility and acceptability. The aim of this study was to describe the development of an implementation intervention for the T(3) Trial (Triage, Treatment and Transfer of patients with stroke in emergency departments (EDs)) using theory to recommend behaviour change techniques (BCTs) and drawing on the research evidence base and practical issues of feasibility and acceptability. METHODS: A stepped method for developing complex interventions based on theory, evidence and practical issues was adapted using the following steps: (1) Who needs to do what, differently? (2) Using a theoretical framework, which barriers and enablers need to be addressed? (3) Which intervention components (behaviour change techniques and mode(s) of delivery) could overcome the modifiable barriers and enhance the enablers? A researcher panel was convened to review the list of BCTs recommended for use and to identify the most feasible and acceptable techniques to adopt. RESULTS: Seventy-six barriers were reported by hospital staff who attended the workshops (step 1: thirteen TDF domains likely to influence the implementation of the T(3) Trial clinical intervention were identified by the researchers; step 2: the researcher panellists then selected one third of the BCTs recommended for use as appropriate for the clinical context of the ED and, using the enabler workshop data, devised enabling strategies for each of the selected BCTs; and step 3: the final implementation intervention consisted of 27 BCTs). CONCLUSIONS: The TDF was successfully applied in all steps of developing an implementation intervention for the T(3) Trial clinical intervention. The use of researcher panel opinion was an essential part of the BCT selection process to incorporate both research evidence and expert judgment. It is recommended that this stepped approach (theory, evidence and practical issues of feasibility and acceptability) is used to develop highly reportable implementation interventions. The classifying of BCTs using recognised implementation intervention components will facilitate generalisability and sharing across different conditions and clinical settings.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s13012-017-0616-6
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30100434

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 65 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 27 Jul 2017, 09:28:27 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.