Openly accessible

Tool-assisted rhythmic drumming in palm cockatoos shares key elements of human instrumental music

Heinsohn, Robert, Zdenek, Christina N, Cunningham, Ross B, Endler, John A and Langmore, Naomi E 2017, Tool-assisted rhythmic drumming in palm cockatoos shares key elements of human instrumental music, Science advances, vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 1-6, doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1602399.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
endler-toolassistedrhythmic-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.51MB 2

Title Tool-assisted rhythmic drumming in palm cockatoos shares key elements of human instrumental music
Author(s) Heinsohn, Robert
Zdenek, Christina N
Cunningham, Ross B
Endler, John AORCID iD for Endler, John A orcid.org/0000-0002-7557-7627
Langmore, Naomi E
Journal name Science advances
Volume number 3
Issue number 6
Article ID e1602399
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Sciences
Place of publication Washington, D.C.
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 2375-2548
Keyword(s) Palm cockatoos (Probosciger aterrimus)
Drumming
Instrumental music
Rhythm
Evolution of rhythmicity
Regular beat
Percussion
Biomusicality
Evolution of rhythm
Animal tool use
Summary All human societies have music with a rhythmic “beat,” typically produced with percussive instruments such as drums. The set of capacities that allows humans to produce and perceive music appears to be deeply rooted in human biology, but an understanding of its evolutionary origins requires cross-taxa comparisons. We show that drumming by palm cockatoos (Probosciger aterrimus) shares the key rudiments of human instrumental music, including manufacture of a sound tool, performance in a consistent context, regular beat production, repeated components, and individual styles. Over 131 drumming sequences produced by 18 males, the beats occurred at nonrandom, regular intervals, yet individual males differed significantly in the shape parameters describing the distribution of their beat patterns, indicating individual drumming styles. Autocorrelation analyses of the longest drumming sequences further showed that they were highly regular and predictable like human music. These discoveries provide a rare comparative perspective on the evolution of rhythmicity and instrumental music in our own species, and show that a preference for a regular beat can have other origins before being co-opted into group-based music and dance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1602399
Field of Research 060305 Evolution of Developmental Systems
060801 Animal Behaviour
060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30100680

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 67 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 14 Aug 2017, 18:09:44 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.