Hawksley random zero sphygmomanometer versus the standard sphygmomanometer: an investigation of mechanisms.

Kinirons, MT, Maskrey, VL, Lawson, Mary, Swift, CG and Jackson, SH 1995, Hawksley random zero sphygmomanometer versus the standard sphygmomanometer: an investigation of mechanisms., Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 9, no. 7, pp. 571-573.


Title Hawksley random zero sphygmomanometer versus the standard sphygmomanometer: an investigation of mechanisms.
Author(s) Kinirons, MT
Maskrey, VL
Lawson, MaryORCID iD for Lawson, Mary orcid.org/0000-0002-9409-6466
Swift, CG
Jackson, SH
Journal name Journal of Human Hypertension
Volume number 9
Issue number 7
Start page 571
End page 573
Total pages 3
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication England
Publication date 1995-07
ISSN 0950-9240
Keyword(s) Blood Pressure Determination
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Summary There has been recent controversy over the accuracy of the Hawksley random zero sphygmomanometer (RZS). In most instances, there has been a bias towards lower recordings with the RZS. In an attempt to identify the mechanism, we designed a study to test the hypothesis that biased error is due to: (1) the magnitude of the random zero; and (2) the magnitude of the pressure being recorded. A RZS (60 mm Hg zero UK version) was connected via a Y-tube to a standard mercury sphygmomanometer (SMS). The circumference of the cam responsible for the variable reservoir size in the RZS was marked into quarters. Within each 10 mm Hg band from 300 to 60 mm Hg, 12 paired readings were taken randomly: three within each of the four quarters of the cam circumference. The mean SMS value was 148.8 vs. 148.2 mm Hg for the RZS. Although of minimal biological significance this difference was highly significant (t = 6.2; p < 0.0001). Our findings fail to confirm the difference between RZS and SMS previously reported and we did not find any evidence of a relation in the difference between SMS and RZS and either the random zero value or the height of the blood pressure. Our findings suggest that if the RZS does under record BP versus the SMS it may relate to a patient-machine interaction not detectable in our system.
Language eng
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
HERDC Research category CN.1 Other journal article
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101141

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
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