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Nursing strategies for engaging families of older immigrants hospitalized for end-of-life care: an Australian study

Johnstone, Megan-Jane, Hutchinson, Alison M., Rawson, Helen and Redley, Bernice 2016, Nursing strategies for engaging families of older immigrants hospitalized for end-of-life care: an Australian study, Journal of patient experience, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 57-63, doi: 10.1177/2374373516667004.

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Title Nursing strategies for engaging families of older immigrants hospitalized for end-of-life care: an Australian study
Author(s) Johnstone, Megan-Jane
Hutchinson, Alison M.ORCID iD for Hutchinson, Alison M. orcid.org/0000-0001-5065-2726
Rawson, HelenORCID iD for Rawson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0001-5363-729X
Redley, BerniceORCID iD for Redley, Bernice orcid.org/0000-0002-2376-3989
Journal name Journal of patient experience
Volume number 3
Issue number 3
Start page 57
End page 63
Total pages 7
Publisher Sage Publications
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-09
ISSN 2374-3735
Keyword(s) Australia
aged
cultural diversity
end-of-life care
engagement
family
hospitalization
immigrants
nurse–family relationships
Summary BACKGROUND: Engaging with families of older non-English-speaking background (NESB) immigrants hospitalized for end-of-life (EOL) care can be challenging, especially when their cultures, lifeways, and family decision-making processes are unfamiliar to the nurses caring for them. Despite the recognized importance of family engagement when providing EOL care, the issue of ethnic minority family engagement has received little attention in the field.

AIM: To explore and describe the strategies nurses use to facilitate engagement with families of older immigrant NESB patients hospitalized for EOL care.

METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Data were collected via in-depth interviews conducted with 22 registered nurses recruited from 4 Australian health services.

FINDINGS: Using thematic analysis processes, 5 key strategies were identified: listening and understanding families, encouraging family members to speak first, dealing with angst, redressing naive views about the dying process, and managing intergenerational differences. Underpinning these strategies was a profound "will to engage" with the families and their cultural worldviews.

CONCLUSION: Further cross-cultural comparative research is required to inform evidence-based policies, practice, and education on this issue.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/2374373516667004
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101564

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.