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The feasibility and acceptability of a web-based alcohol management intervention in community sports clubs: a cross-sectional study

McFadyen, Tameka, Wolfenden, Luke, Wiggers, John, Tindall, Jenny, Yoong, Sze Lin, Lecathelinais, Christophe, Gillham, Karen, Sherker, Shauna, Rowland, Bosco, McLaren, Nicola and Kingsland, Melanie 2017, The feasibility and acceptability of a web-based alcohol management intervention in community sports clubs: a cross-sectional study, JMIR research protocols, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.2196/resprot.6859.

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Title The feasibility and acceptability of a web-based alcohol management intervention in community sports clubs: a cross-sectional study
Author(s) McFadyen, Tameka
Wolfenden, Luke
Wiggers, John
Tindall, Jenny
Yoong, Sze Lin
Lecathelinais, Christophe
Gillham, Karen
Sherker, Shauna
Rowland, BoscoORCID iD for Rowland, Bosco orcid.org/0000-0003-0192-809X
McLaren, Nicola
Kingsland, Melanie
Journal name JMIR research protocols
Volume number 6
Issue number 6
Article ID e123
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher JMIR Publications
Place of publication Toronto, Ont.
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 1929-0748
Keyword(s) Internet
TAM
Web
alcohol
eHealth
implementation
sports
technology
Summary BACKGROUND: The implementation of comprehensive alcohol management strategies can reduce excessive alcohol use and reduce the risk of alcohol-related harm at sporting venues. Supporting sports venues to implement alcohol management strategies via the Web may represent an effective and efficient means of reducing harm caused by alcohol in this setting. However, the feasibility and acceptability of such an approach is unknown.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify (1) the current access to and use of the Web and electronic devices by sports clubs; (2) the perceived usefulness, ease of use, and intention to use a Web-based program to support implementation of alcohol management policies in sports clubs; (3) the factors associated with intention to use such a Web-based support program; and (4) the specific features of such a program that sports clubs would find useful.

METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with club administrators of community football clubs in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Perceived usefulness, ease of use and intention to use a hypothetical Web-based alcohol management support program was assessed using the validated Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) instrument. Associations between intention to use a Web-based program and club characteristics as well as perceived ease of use and usefulness was tested using Fisher's exact test and represented using relative risk (RR) for high intention to use the program.

RESULTS: Of the 73 football clubs that were approached to participate in the study, 63 consented to participate and 46 were eligible and completed the survey. All participants reported having access to the Web and 98% reported current use of electronic devices (eg, computers, iPads/tablets, smartphones, laptops, televisions, and smartboards). Mean scores (out of a possible 7) for the TAM constructs were high for intention to use (mean 6.25, SD 0.87), perceived ease of use (mean 6.00, SD 0.99), and perceived usefulness (mean 6.17, SD 0.85). Intention to use the Web-based alcohol management program was significantly associated with perceived ease of use (P=.02, RR 1.4, CI 1.0-2.9), perceived usefulness (P=.03, RR 1.5, CI 1.0-6.8) and club size (P=.02, RR 0.8, CI 0.5-0.9). The most useful features of such a program included the perceived ability to complete program requirements within users' own time, complete program accreditation assessment and monitoring online, develop tailored action plans, and receive email reminders and prompts to complete action.

CONCLUSIONS: A Web-based alcohol management approach to support sports clubs in the implementation of recommended alcohol management policies appears both feasible and acceptable. Future research should aim to determine if such intended use leads to actual use and club implementation of alcohol management policies.
Language eng
DOI 10.2196/resprot.6859
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Tameka McFadyen, Luke Wolfenden, John Wiggers, Jenny Tindall, Sze Lin Yoong, Christophe Lecathelinais, Karen Gillham, Shauna Sherker, Bosco Rowland, Nicola McLaren, Melanie Kingsland
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101588

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.