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An investigation of sensory specific satiety and food size when children consume a whole or diced vegetable

Goh, Jasmine R, Russell, Catherine G and Liem, Djin G 2017, An investigation of sensory specific satiety and food size when children consume a whole or diced vegetable, Foods, vol. 6, no. 7, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.3390/foods6070055.

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Title An investigation of sensory specific satiety and food size when children consume a whole or diced vegetable
Author(s) Goh, Jasmine R
Russell, Catherine G
Liem, Djin GORCID iD for Liem, Djin G orcid.org/0000-0002-6619-6101
Journal name Foods
Volume number 6
Issue number 7
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-07-24
ISSN 2304-8158
Keyword(s) carrot
children
consumption
liking
sensory specific satiety
taste
unit bias
variety
vegetable
Summary Children's vegetable consumption is often lower than that needed to promote optimal health and development, and practical approaches for increasing vegetable consumption are needed. Sensory Specific Satiety (SSS) reduces the liking and consumption of a consumed food over the course of an eating occasion and is an important factor in meal termination. The present study aimed to investigate the development of SSS when children ate vegetables of different sizes. The absence of SSS would be an encouraging sign to provide children more vegetables during a meal. Seventy-two children (33 boys, ages 8.8 ± 1.5 years) were recruited from Australian primary schools. Participating children consumed either whole or diced carrots for a maximum period of 10-min from a 500 g box. Cucumber was used as a control vegetable. Children's liking of carrots and cucumber was measured with a 5-point child friendly hedonic scale prior to and after carrot consumption. In comparison to cucumber, liking for neither diced (p = 0.57) nor whole carrots (p = 0.18) changed during ad libitum consumption of carrots, indicating that SSS did not occur. However, children (n = 36) who finished eating carrots within the 10-min time limit, spent more time eating the whole carrots compared to the diced carrots (p < 0.05), which tended to result in a higher consumption of whole carrots (p < 0.06). This suggests that, in order to increase vegetable consumption, it is better to present children whole carrots than diced carrots. These findings might aid in the development of strategies to promote children's greater vegetable consumption.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/foods6070055
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101601

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.