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Neutrophil and monocyte bactericidal responses to 10 weeks of low-volume high-intensity interval or moderate-intensity continuous training in sedentary adults

Bartlett, David B, Shepherd, Sam O, Wilson, Oliver J, Adlan, Ahmed M, Wagenmakers, Anton JM, Shaw, Christopher S and Lord, Janet M 2017, Neutrophil and monocyte bactericidal responses to 10 weeks of low-volume high-intensity interval or moderate-intensity continuous training in sedentary adults, Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity, vol. 2017, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1155/2017/8148742.

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Title Neutrophil and monocyte bactericidal responses to 10 weeks of low-volume high-intensity interval or moderate-intensity continuous training in sedentary adults
Author(s) Bartlett, David B
Shepherd, Sam O
Wilson, Oliver J
Adlan, Ahmed M
Wagenmakers, Anton JM
Shaw, Christopher SORCID iD for Shaw, Christopher S orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Lord, Janet M
Journal name Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity
Volume number 2017
Article ID 8148742
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Place of publication Cairo, Egypt
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1942-0900
1942-0994
Keyword(s) neutrophil
monocyte
ageing
sedentary adults
high-intensity interval training (HIIT)
moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT)
immune function
Summary Neutrophils and monocytes are key components of the innate immune system that undergo age-associated declines in function. This study compared the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on immune function in sedentary adults. Twenty-seven (43 ± 11 years) healthy sedentary adults were randomized into ten weeks of either a HIIT (>90% maximum heart rate) or MICT (70% maximum heart rate) group training program. Aerobic capacity (VO2peak), neutrophil and monocyte bacterial phagocytosis and oxidative burst, cell surface receptor expression, and systemic inflammation were measured before and after the training. Total exercise time commitment was 57% less for HIIT compared to that for MICT while both significantly improved VO2peak similarly. Neutrophil phagocytosis and oxidative burst and monocyte phagocytosis and percentage of monocytes producing an oxidative burst were improved by training similarly in both groups. Expression of monocyte but not neutrophil CD16, TLR2, and TLR4 was reduced by training similarly in both groups. No differences in systemic inflammation were observed for training; however, leptin was reduced in the MICT group only. With similar immune-enhancing effects for HIIT compared to those for MICT at 50% of the time commitment, our results support HIIT as a time efficient exercise option to improve neutrophil and monocyte function.
Language eng
DOI 10.1155/2017/8148742
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, David B. Bartlett et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101608

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.