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Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training

Bradley, Helen, Shaw, Chistopher S, Worthington, Philip L, Shepherd, Sam O, Cocks, Matthew and Wagenmakers, Anton JM 2014, Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training, Physiological reports, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 1-16, doi: 10.14814/phy2.12085.

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Title Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training
Author(s) Bradley, Helen
Shaw, Chistopher SORCID iD for Shaw, Chistopher S orcid.org/0000-0003-1499-0220
Worthington, Philip L
Shepherd, Sam O
Cocks, Matthew
Wagenmakers, Anton JM
Journal name Physiological reports
Volume number 2
Issue number 7
Article ID e12085
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Publisher Wiley Periodicals
Place of publication Malden, Mass.
Publication date 2014-07-22
ISSN 2051-817X
2051-817X
Keyword(s) Glucose uptake
Insulin sensitivity
Skeletal muscle
Summary Increases in insulin‐mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (<1 μm) GLUT4‐containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans‐Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes.
Language eng
DOI 10.14814/phy2.12085
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101611

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.