Openly accessible

Virtual palaeontology: the effects of mineral composition and texture of fossil shell and hosting rock on the quality of X-ray microtomography (XMT) outcomes using Palaeozoic brachiopods

Lee, Sangmin, Shi, G.R., Park, Tae-Yoon S., Oh, Jae-Ryong, Mii, Horng-Sheng and Lee, Mirinae 2017, Virtual palaeontology: the effects of mineral composition and texture of fossil shell and hosting rock on the quality of X-ray microtomography (XMT) outcomes using Palaeozoic brachiopods, Palaeontologia electronica, vol. 20, pp. 1-25.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
shi-virtualpalaeontology-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 46.66MB 9

Title Virtual palaeontology: the effects of mineral composition and texture of fossil shell and hosting rock on the quality of X-ray microtomography (XMT) outcomes using Palaeozoic brachiopods
Author(s) Lee, SangminORCID iD for Lee, Sangmin orcid.org/0000-0001-6984-0575
Shi, G.R.ORCID iD for Shi, G.R. orcid.org/0000-0002-5126-4036
Park, Tae-Yoon S.
Oh, Jae-Ryong
Mii, Horng-Sheng
Lee, Mirinae
Journal name Palaeontologia electronica
Volume number 20
Article ID 20.2.3T
Start page 1
End page 25
Total pages 25
Publisher Coquina Press
Place of publication Columbia, Calif.
Publication date 2017-06
ISSN 1094-8074
Keyword(s) computed tomography
internal structures
sedimentary infilling
diagenesis
three-dimensional reconstruction
Summary X-ray microtomography (XMT) has become a popular tool for detailed investigations of a diverse range of fossils. However, XMT has not always guaranteed a satisfactory result, as the resolution of XMT images critically depends on the contrast between the fossil and its hosting rock. In this paper, XMT was applied to 11 Palaeozoic brachiopod specimens selected from a range of sedimentary rocks in order to investigate the extent of effects of mineral composition and texture in the rock and fossil shell on the quality of XMT outcomes. Our study shows that sufficient contrast in mineral composition and texture between the brachiopod shell and its infilling material is required to reproduce high-quality XMT results. Specifically, brachiopod specimens with their original calcium carbonate shell, infilled mainly with quartz grains, appear to produce the best XMT results characterized by sharply defined shell internal structures. We also found that diagenesis is significant in determining the XMT quality. Diagenetic processes including silicification and recrystallization in the brachiopod shell and/or the infilling material generally tends to diminish the resolution of the XMT results, although this impact is considerably complicated by the degree and aspect of diagenesis. Another factor of minor significance concerns the presence of bioclasts scattered in the hosting sediment that potentially could be confused with genuine shell internal structures.
Language eng
Field of Research 0403 Geology
0602 Ecology
0603 Evolutionary Biology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101741

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 77 Abstract Views, 10 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 21 Aug 2017, 19:46:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.