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The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study

Bhatt, Ravi R., Martin, Sarah R., Evans, Subhadra, Lung, Kristen, Coates, Thomas D., Zeltzer, Lonnie K. and Tsao, Jennie C. 2017, The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study, Journal of pain research, vol. 10, pp. 1635-1644, doi: 10.2147/JPR.S131859.

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Title The effect of hypnosis on pain and peripheral blood flow in sickle-cell disease: a pilot study
Author(s) Bhatt, Ravi R.
Martin, Sarah R.
Evans, SubhadraORCID iD for Evans, Subhadra orcid.org/0000-0002-1898-0030
Lung, Kristen
Coates, Thomas D.
Zeltzer, Lonnie K.
Tsao, Jennie C.
Journal name Journal of pain research
Volume number 10
Start page 1635
End page 1644
Total pages 10
Publisher Dove Medical Press (Dovepress)
Place of publication Macclesfield, Eng.
Publication date 2017-07-14
ISSN 1178-7090
Keyword(s) blood
hypnosis
pain
sickle-cell disease
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Clinical Neurology
Neurosciences & Neurology
CLINICAL IMPORTANCE
HYPNOTIC ANALGESIA
NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
VASODILATION
DYSFUNCTION
MODULATION
MECHANISMS
RESPONSES
MODEL
Summary Background: Vaso-occlusive pain crises (VOCs) are the “hallmark” of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can lead to sympathetic nervous system dysfunction. Increased sympathetic nervous system activation during VOCs and/or pain can result in vasoconstriction, which may increase the risk for subsequent VOCs and pain. Hypnosis is a neuromodulatory intervention that may attenuate vascular and pain responsiveness. Due to the lack of laboratory-controlled pain studies in patients with SCD and healthy controls, the specific effects of hypnosis on acute pain-associated vascular responses are unknown. The current study assessed the effects of hypnosis on peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity in adults with and without SCD.

Subjects and methods: Fourteen patients with SCD and 14 healthy controls were included. Participants underwent three laboratory pain tasks before and during a 30-minute hypnosis session. Peripheral blood flow, pain threshold, tolerance, and intensity before and during hypnosis were examined.

Results:
A single 30-minute hypnosis session decreased pain intensity by a moderate amount in patients with SCD. Pain threshold and tolerance increased following hypnosis in the control group, but not in patients with SCD. Patients with SCD exhibited lower baseline peripheral blood flow and a greater increase in blood flow following hypnosis than controls.

Conclusion: Given that peripheral vasoconstriction plays a role in the development of VOC, current findings provide support for further laboratory and clinical investigations of the effects of cognitive–behavioral neuromodulatory interventions on pain responses and peripheral vascular flow in patients with SCD. Current results suggest that hypnosis may increase peripheral vasodilation during both the anticipation and experience of pain in patients with SCD. These findings indicate a need for further examination of the effects of hypnosis on pain and vascular responses utilizing a randomized controlled trial design. Further evidence may help determine unique effects of hypnosis and potential benefits of integrating cognitive–behavioral neuromodulatory interventions into SCD treatment.
Language eng
DOI 10.2147/JPR.S131859
Field of Research 1103 Clinical Sciences
1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101749

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.