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Enhancing the use of research in health-promoting, anti-racism policy

Ferdinand, Angeline S, Paradies, Yin and Kelaher, Margaret 2017, Enhancing the use of research in health-promoting, anti-racism policy, Health research policy and systems, vol. 15, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12961-017-0223-7.

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Title Enhancing the use of research in health-promoting, anti-racism policy
Author(s) Ferdinand, Angeline S
Paradies, YinORCID iD for Paradies, Yin orcid.org/0000-0001-9927-7074
Kelaher, Margaret
Journal name Health research policy and systems
Volume number 15
Article ID 61
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-07-11
ISSN 1478-4505
Keyword(s) Aboriginal
anti-racism
cultural diversity
double-loop learning
health
implementation
interventions
knowledge translation
organisations
partnerships
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
health policy & services
health care sciences & services
Summary BACKGROUND: The Localities Embracing and Accepting Diversity (LEAD) programme was established to improve the health of ethnic minority communities through the reduction of racial discrimination. Local governments in the state of Victoria, Australia, were at the forefront of LEAD implementation in collaboration with leading state and national organisations. Key aims included expanding the available evidence regarding effective anti-racism interventions and facilitating the uptake of this evidence in organisational policies and practices.

METHODS: One rural and one metropolitan local government areas were selected to participate in LEAD. Key informant interviews and discussions were conducted with individuals who had participated in LEAD implementation and members of LEAD governance structures. Data were also collected on programme processes and implementation, partnership formation and organisational assessments.

RESULTS: The LEAD model demonstrated both strengths and weaknesses in terms of facilitating the use of evidence in a complex, community-based health promotion initiative. Representation of implementing, funding and advisory bodies at different levels of governance enabled the input of technical advice and guidance alongside design and implementation. The representation structure assisted in ensuring the development of a programme that was acceptable to all partners and informed by the best available evidence. Simultaneous evaluation also enhanced perceived validity of the intervention, allowed for strategy correction when necessary and supported the process of double-loop organisational learning. However, due to the model's demand for simultaneous and intensive effort by various organisations, when particular elements of the intervention were not functional, there was a considerable loss of time and resources across the partner organisations. The complexity of the model also presented a challenge in ensuring clarity regarding roles, functions and the direction of the programme.

CONCLUSIONS: The example of LEAD provides guidance on mechanisms to strengthen the entry of evidence into complex community-based health promotion programmes. The paper highlights some of the strengths and weaknesses of the LEAD model and implications for practical collaboration between policymakers, implementers and researchers.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12961-017-0223-7
Field of Research 160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified
1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30101789

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.