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Development of the organisational health literacy responsiveness (Org-HLR) framework in collaboration with health and social services professionals

Trezona, Anita, Dodson, Sarity and Osborne, Richard H. 2017, Development of the organisational health literacy responsiveness (Org-HLR) framework in collaboration with health and social services professionals, BMC health services research, no. 17, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2465-z.

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Title Development of the organisational health literacy responsiveness (Org-HLR) framework in collaboration with health and social services professionals
Author(s) Trezona, Anita
Dodson, Sarity
Osborne, Richard H.ORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H. orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Journal name BMC health services research
Issue number 17
Article ID 513
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-01
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Access
Concept mapping
Equity
Health literacy
Health literacy responsiveness
Health system improvement
Health systems
Health systems strengthening
Service improvements
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
CARE
SYSTEMS
VALIDATION
QUALITY
ENGAGE
ADULTS
Summary BACKGROUND: The health literacy skills required by individuals to interact effectively with health services depends on the complexity of those services, and the demands they place on people. Public health and social service organisations have a responsibility to provide services and information in ways that promote equitable access and engagement, that are responsive to diverse needs and preferences, and support people to participate in decisions regarding their health and wellbeing. The aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework describing the characteristics of health literacy responsive organisations.

METHODS: Concept mapping (CM) workshops with six groups of professionals (total N = 42) from across health and social services sectors were undertaken. An online concept mapping consultation with 153 professionals was also conducted. In these CM activities, participants responded to the seeding statement "Thinking broadly from your experiences of working in the health system, what does an organisation need to have or do in order to enable communities and community members to fully engage with information and services to promote and maintain health and wellbeing". The CM data were analysed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses to derive concept maps and cluster tree diagrams. Clusters from the CM processes were then integrated by identifying themes and subthemes across tree diagrams.

RESULTS: Across the workshops, 373 statements were generated in response to the seeding statement. An additional 1206 statements were generated in the online consultation. 84 clusters were derived within the workshops and 20 from the online consultation. Seven domains of health literacy responsiveness were identified; i) External policy and funding environment; ii) Leadership and culture; iii) Systems, processes and policies; iv) Access to services and programs; v) Community engagement and partnerships; vi) Communication practices and standards; and vii) Workforce. Each domain included 1 to 5 sub-domains (24 sub-domains in total).

CONCLUSIONS: Using participatory research processes, a conceptual framework describing the characteristics, values, practices and capabilities of organisational health literacy responsiveness was derived. The framework may guide the planning and monitoring of health service and health system improvements, and has the potential to guide effective public health policy and health system reforms.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2465-z
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
111709 Health Care Administration
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102146

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.