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Healthcare use and expenditure for diabetes in Bangladesh

Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful, Lechner, Andreas, Ferrari, Uta, Laxy, Michael, Seissler, Jochen, Brown, Jonathan, Niessen, Louis W and Holle, Rolf 2017, Healthcare use and expenditure for diabetes in Bangladesh, BMJ global health, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000033.

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Title Healthcare use and expenditure for diabetes in Bangladesh
Author(s) Islam, Sheikh Mohammed SharifulORCID iD for Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful orcid.org/0000-0001-7926-9368
Lechner, Andreas
Ferrari, Uta
Laxy, Michael
Seissler, Jochen
Brown, Jonathan
Niessen, Louis W
Holle, Rolf
Journal name BMJ global health
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Article ID e000033
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2059-7908
Keyword(s) diabetes
cost
treatment
management
developing countries
healthcare
expenditure
Bangladesh
prevention
Summary Background Diabetes imposes a huge social and economic impact on nations. However, information on the costs of treating and managing diabetes in developing countries is limited. The aim of this study was to estimate healthcare use and expenditure for diabetes in Bangladesh.

Methods We conducted a matched case–control study between January and July 2014 among 591 adults with diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DMs) and 591 age-matched, sex-matched and residence-matched persons without diabetes mellitus (non-DMs). We recruited DMs from consecutive patients and non-DMs from accompanying persons in the Bangladesh Institute of Health Science (BIHS) hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We estimated the impact of diabetes on healthcare use and expenditure by calculating ratios and differences between DMs and non-DMs for all expenses related to healthcare use and tested for statistical difference using Student's t-tests.

Results DMs had two times more days of inpatient treatment, 1.3 times more outpatient visits, and 9.7 times more medications than non-DMs (all p<0.005). The total annual per capita expenditure on medical care was 6.1 times higher for DMs than non-DMs (US$635 vs US$104, respectively). Among DMs, 9.8% reported not taking any antidiabetic medications, 46.4% took metformin, 38.7% sulfonylurea, 40.8% insulin, 38.7% any antihypertensive medication, and 14.2% took anti-lipids over the preceding 3 months.

Conclusions Diabetes significantly increases healthcare use and expenditure and is likely to impose a huge economic burden on the healthcare systems in Bangladesh. The study highlights the importance of prevention and optimum management of diabetes in Bangladesh and other developing countries, to gain a strong economic incentive through implementing multisectoral approach and cost-effective prevention strategies.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjgh-2016-000033
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102249

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.