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Weighting health outcomes by socioeconomic position using stated preferences

Lal, Anita, Siahpush, Mohammad, Moodie, Marjory, Peeters, Anna and Carter, Robert 2018, Weighting health outcomes by socioeconomic position using stated preferences, PharmacoEconomics - Open, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 43-51, doi: 10.1007/s41669-017-0036-1.

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Title Weighting health outcomes by socioeconomic position using stated preferences
Author(s) Lal, AnitaORCID iD for Lal, Anita orcid.org/0000-0001-6921-6617
Siahpush, Mohammad
Moodie, MarjoryORCID iD for Moodie, Marjory orcid.org/0000-0001-6890-5250
Peeters, AnnaORCID iD for Peeters, Anna orcid.org/0000-0003-4340-9132
Carter, RobertORCID iD for Carter, Robert orcid.org/0000-0002-1586-5619
Journal name PharmacoEconomics - Open
Volume number 2
Issue number 1
Start page 43
End page 51
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer International
Place of publication Cham, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-03
ISSN 2509-4262
2509-4254
Summary Background
The trade-off that society is willing to make to promote a more equitable distribution of health can be represented as a social welfare function (SWF). SWFs are an economic construct that can be used to illustrate concerns for total health with aversion to inequalities between socioeconomic groups.

Objective
This study used people’s preferences to estimate the shapes of health-related SWFs (HRSWFs). We tested the suitability of this method to derive equity weights.

Methods
A questionnaire was used to elicit preferences concerning trade-offs between the total level of health and its distribution among two socioeconomic groups. The participant group was a sample of convenience that included a mix of health researchers, academics, clinicians, managers, public servants and research students. The data collected were used to develop HRSWFs with a constant elasticity of substitution. The weight was calculated using the marginal rate of substitution.

Results
A marginal health gain to the lowest socioeconomic position (SEP) group was valued 14.1–81.4 times more than a marginal health gain to the high SEP group.

Conclusions
Our results provide evidence to support the idea that the public may be willing to make trade-offs between efficiency and equity, and that they value health gains differently depending on which socioeconomic group receives the health gain. Further evidence is required before such indicative weights have practical value.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s41669-017-0036-1
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102352

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.