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Acute effects of reducing sitting time in adolescents: a randomized cross-over study

Penning, Anisse, Okely, Anthony D, Trost, Stewart G, Salmon, Jo, Cliff, Dylan P, Batterham, Marijka, Howard, Steven and Parrish, Anne-Maree 2017, Acute effects of reducing sitting time in adolescents: a randomized cross-over study, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4660-6.

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Title Acute effects of reducing sitting time in adolescents: a randomized cross-over study
Author(s) Penning, Anisse
Okely, Anthony D
Trost, Stewart G
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Cliff, Dylan P
Batterham, Marijka
Howard, Steven
Parrish, Anne-Maree
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 657
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) cardiometabolic
executive function
school
sedentary behaviour
youth
science and technology
life sciences and biomedicine
public, environmental and occupational health
Summary BACKGROUND: Levels of sitting among adolescents are high, especially during the school day. The acute cognitive and health consequences associated with prolonged sitting are poorly understood in adolescents. This randomized crossover design study examined the acute effects of a simulated school day with reduced sitting or usual sitting on adolescents' cognitive function and cardiometabolic biomarkers.

METHODS: Eighteen healthy school aged adolescents were recruited from the community to the study (11 males; 7 females; mean age [SD] = 13.5 ± 0.9 years). Two protocols were developed to simulate an adolescent school day, the amount of time spent sitting was manipulated reflecting: a 'typical' day (65% of the time spent sitting with two sitting bouts sitting >20 min) and a 'reduced sitting' day (adolescents sat for 50% less time with no bouts of sitting >20 mins). The order that participants were exposed to each condition was randomized (via random number generator). Participants were not fully blinded as they could observe the difference between conditions. Energy intake and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were standardized for both conditions and monitored for 48 h post-condition for compensatory effects. Cognitive (working memory) and cardiometabolic outcomes (lipids, glucose, insulin, IL-6, apo-A1, apo-B, blood pressure,) were assessed pre and post for both conditions, BMI and body fat were assessed on the morning of the intervention. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. Standardised effect sizes were calculated.

RESULTS: Compared with the typical school day, the reduced sitting day demonstrated significant positive effects for apoB/apoA-1 ratio (adjusted difference ± SD) -0.02 ± 0.03; P = 0.03; effect size [Cohen's d] = -0.67. Findings for total cholesterol -0.19 ± 0.27; P = 0.28; d = -0.71; HDL cholesterol -0.23 ± 0.50; P = 0.12 d = -0.66; and total cholesterol/HDL ratio 0.25 ± 0.53; P = 0.25; d = 0.51 and for cognition 0.64 ± 0.15; P = 0.15; d = 0.54 were non-significant. There were no compensatory changes in participant energy expenditure or energy intake for 48 h post intervention.

CONCLUSION: Reducing school day sitting time in adolescents' resulted in significant improvements in apoB/apoA-1 ratio with medium effect sizes for total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and total cholesterol/HDL ratio. Cognitive function results showed the equivalent of a 6 month improvement in effective mental-attentional capacity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4660-6
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102363

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.