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Online ethics: where will the interface of mental health and the internet lead us?

Cosgrove, Victoria, Gliddon, Emma, Berk, Lesley, Grimm, David, Lauder, Sue, Dodd, Seetal, Berk, Michael and Suppes, Trisha 2017, Online ethics: where will the interface of mental health and the internet lead us?, International journal of bipolar disorders, vol. 5, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1186/s40345-017-0095-3.

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Title Online ethics: where will the interface of mental health and the internet lead us?
Author(s) Cosgrove, Victoria
Gliddon, Emma
Berk, LesleyORCID iD for Berk, Lesley orcid.org/0000-0002-3677-7503
Grimm, David
Lauder, Sue
Dodd, SeetalORCID iD for Dodd, Seetal orcid.org/0000-0002-7918-4636
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Suppes, Trisha
Journal name International journal of bipolar disorders
Volume number 5
Article ID 26
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher SpringerOpen
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2194-7511
Keyword(s) e-health
mental health care
clinical research
online
Summary While e-health initiatives are poised to revolutionize delivery and access to mental health care, conducting clinical research online involves specific contextual and ethical considerations. Face-to-face psychosocial interventions can at times entail risk and have adverse psychoactive effects, something true for online mental health programs too. Risks associated with and specific to internet psychosocial interventions include potential breaches of confidentiality related to online communications (such as unencrypted email), data privacy and security, risks of self-selection and self-diagnosis as well as the shortcomings of receiving psychoeducation and treatment at distance from an impersonal website. Such ethical issues need to be recognized and proactively managed in website and study design as well as treatment implementation. In order for online interventions to succeed, risks and expectations of all involved need to be carefully considered with a focus on ethical integrity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40345-017-0095-3
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102523

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.