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The relationship between working conditions and self-rated health among medical doctors: evidence from seven waves of the Medicine In Australia Balancing Employment and Life (Mabel) survey

Milner, Allison, Witt, Katrina, Spittal, Matthew J., Bismark, Marie, Graham, Melissa and LaMontagne, Anthony D. 2017, The relationship between working conditions and self-rated health among medical doctors: evidence from seven waves of the Medicine In Australia Balancing Employment and Life (Mabel) survey, BMC health services research, vol. 17, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12913-017-2554-z.

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Title The relationship between working conditions and self-rated health among medical doctors: evidence from seven waves of the Medicine In Australia Balancing Employment and Life (Mabel) survey
Author(s) Milner, AllisonORCID iD for Milner, Allison orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Witt, Katrina
Spittal, Matthew J.
Bismark, Marie
Graham, MelissaORCID iD for Graham, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0002-0927-0002
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 17
Article ID 609
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) Employment
Health
Job stress
Medical doctors
Medicine
Work
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
GENERAL-PRACTITIONERS
PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS
MENTAL-HEALTH
JOB STRAIN
YOUNG PHYSICIANS
STRESS
DEPRESSION
BURNOUT
SATISFACTION
SPECIALISTS
Summary BACKGROUND: Psychosocial job stressors, such as low control and high demands, have been found to influence the health and wellbeing of doctors. However, past research in this area has relied on cross-sectional data, which limits causal inferences about the influence of psychosocial job stressors on health. In this study, we examine this relationship longitudinally while also assessing whether the relationship between psychosocial job stressors and health is modified by gender.

METHODS: The data source was seven annual waves of the Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL) survey. The outcome was self-rated health (measured using the SF-12), and key exposures reflected job control, job demands, work-life balance variables, employment arrangements, and aggression experienced at work. We used longitudinal fixed and random effects regression models to assess within and between-person changes in health.

RESULTS: Excessive job demands, low job control, feelings of not being rewarded at work, and work-life imbalance were associated with higher within-person odds of poorer self-rated health. Gender differences were apparent. For female doctors, work arrangements and work-life imbalance were associated with poorer self-rated health whilst task-based job stressors were associated with poorer self-rated health in male doctors.

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest the importance of addressing adverse working environments among doctors.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2554-z
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
0807 Library And Information Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102618

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.