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Electro-catalytic biodiesel production from canola oil in methanolic and ethanolic solutions with low-cost stainless steel and hybrid ion-exchange resin grafted electrodes

Allioux, Francois-Marie, Holland, Brendan J, Kong, Lingxue and Dumee, Ludovic F 2017, Electro-catalytic biodiesel production from canola oil in methanolic and ethanolic solutions with low-cost stainless steel and hybrid ion-exchange resin grafted electrodes, Frontiers in materials, vol. 4, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fmats.2017.00022.

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Title Electro-catalytic biodiesel production from canola oil in methanolic and ethanolic solutions with low-cost stainless steel and hybrid ion-exchange resin grafted electrodes
Author(s) Allioux, Francois-Marie
Holland, Brendan J
Kong, LingxueORCID iD for Kong, Lingxue orcid.org/0000-0001-6219-3897
Dumee, Ludovic FORCID iD for Dumee, Ludovic F orcid.org/0000-0002-0264-4024
Journal name Frontiers in materials
Volume number 4
Article ID 22
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-07
ISSN 2296-8016
Keyword(s) biodiesel
electro-catalytic conversion
ion-exchange resin
porous stainless steel electrodes
hybrid electrodes
Summary Biodiesel is a growing alternative to petroleum fuels and is produced by the catalyzed transesterification of fats in presence of an alcohol base. Transesterification processes using homogeneous catalysts are considered to be among the most efficient methods but rely on the feedstock quality and low water content in order to avoid undesirable saponification reactions. In this work, the electro-catalytic conversion of canola oil to biodiesel in a 1% aqueous methanolic and ethanolic reaction mixture was performed without the addition of external catalyst or cosolvent. An inexpensive stainless steel (SS) electrode and a hybrid SS electrode coated with an ion-exchange resin catalyst were used as cathode materials while the anode was composed of a plain carbon paper. The cell voltages were varied from 10 to 40 V and the reaction temperature maintained at 20 or 40°C. The canola oil conversion rates were found to be superior at 40°C without saponification reactions for cell voltages below 30 V. The conversion rates were as high as 87% for the hybrid electrode and 81% for the plain SS electrode. This work could inspire new process development for the conversion of high water content feedstock for the production of second-generation biodiesel.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmats.2017.00022
Field of Research 030102 Electroanalytical Chemistry
090405 Non-Automotive Combustion and Fuel Engineering (incl Alternative/Renewable Fuels)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Allioux, Holland, Kong and Dumée
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102942

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.