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Mate similarity in foraging Kerguelen shags: a combined bio-logging and stable isotope investigation

Camprasse, Elodie C. M., Cherel, Yves, Arnould, John P. Y., Hoskins, Andrew J., Bustamante, Paco and Bost, Charles-Andre 2017, Mate similarity in foraging Kerguelen shags: a combined bio-logging and stable isotope investigation, Marine ecology progress series, vol. 578, pp. 183-196, doi: 10.3354/meps12259.

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Title Mate similarity in foraging Kerguelen shags: a combined bio-logging and stable isotope investigation
Author(s) Camprasse, Elodie C. M.
Cherel, Yves
Arnould, John P. Y.ORCID iD for Arnould, John P. Y. orcid.org/0000-0003-1124-9330
Hoskins, Andrew J.
Bustamante, Paco
Bost, Charles-Andre
Journal name Marine ecology progress series
Volume number 578
Start page 183
End page 196
Total pages 14
Publisher Inter-Research
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publication date 2017-08-31
ISSN 0171-8630
Keyword(s) pair similarity
mate choice
kerguelen shags
spatial use
diving behaviour
diet
stable isotopes
Summary Similarity or dissimilarity between 2 individuals that have formed a pair to breed can occur in morphology, behaviour and diet. Such patterns influence partners’ cooperation when rearing their offspring, consequently influencing reproductive success. They may confer different benefits, depending on species and contexts. However, the extent to which breeding partners are more similar in morphology, behaviour, and diet is poorly documented. Furthermore, the relationship between behavioural consistency and mate choice is particularly poorly understood. To investigate these issues, Kerguelen shags Phalacrocorax verrucosus, which are monogamous with high mate fidelity across years, were studied. Partners were equipped with GPS and diving behaviour loggers. Feather and blood samples were analysed for stable isotopes (δ13C, a proxy of foraging habitat, and δ15N, a proxy of diet/trophic position). Generalized linear mixed effects models and permutation tests were used to investigate pair similarity in morphology, foraging behaviour, behavioural consistency, overlap in foraging areas, and diets/foraging habitats. Mates were found not to exhibit size-assortative mating, but were more similar in foraging behaviour. They did not show assortative or disassortative mating based on foraging behavioural consistency. Furthermore, they followed more similar bearings and overlapped more in foraging areas. In accordance with this, partners were more similar in δ15N. Given the lack of assortative mating by morphology, the similarity in behaviour could be due to individuals selecting mates with similar foraging abilities, linked with individual quality, and/or subsequently using information gained from their partners’ foraging strategies (e.g. local enhancement). This could help breeding pairs increase their foraging efficiency and reproductive success.
Language eng
DOI 10.3354/meps12259
Field of Research 0602 Ecology
0608 Zoology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30102992

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.