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Are nurses meeting the needs of men in primary care?

Lovett, Del, Rasmussen, Bodil, Holden, Carol and Livingston, Patricia M. 2017, Are nurses meeting the needs of men in primary care?, Australian Journal of Primary Health, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 319-322, doi: 10.1071/PY16106.

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Title Are nurses meeting the needs of men in primary care?
Author(s) Lovett, Del
Rasmussen, BodilORCID iD for Rasmussen, Bodil orcid.org/0000-0002-6789-8260
Holden, Carol
Livingston, Patricia M.ORCID iD for Livingston, Patricia M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6616-3839
Journal name Australian Journal of Primary Health
Volume number 23
Issue number 4
Start page 319
End page 322
Total pages 4
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2017-07-27
ISSN 1448-7527
1836-7399
Keyword(s) access
barriers
men's health
opportunistic
primary health nurse
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
Health Policy & Services
Primary Health Care
Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
General & Internal Medicine
Summary Meeting men’s health needs by improving healthcare service access is a key objective of comprehensive primary health care. The aims of this qualitative study were to explore the perception of nurses in men’s health services and to describe men’s expectation of the nurse. The comparative component identifies the barriers and facilitators to improved access to health services. A purposive sample of 19 nurses and 20 men was recruited from metropolitan and regional settings in the state of Victoria, Australia, and each participant was interviewed individually or as part of three focus groups. The main findings were: nurses and men were unclear on the role of the nurse in men’s health; and health promotion provided by nurses was predominantly opportunistic. Both participant groups indicated barriers to healthcare access related to: the culture and environment in general practice; limitation of Australia’s Medicare healthcare financing system; out-of-pocket costs, waiting time and lack of extended hours; and men not wanting to be perceived as complainers. Facilitators related to: positive inter-professional relations; effective communication; personal qualities; and level of preparedness of nurse education. The findings demonstrate a need for the role to be better understood by both men and nurses in order to develop alternative approaches to meeting men’s healthcare needs.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/PY16106
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
16 Studies In Human Society
17 Psychology And Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103125

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.