Autism-relevant traits interact with temporoparietal junction stimulation effects on social cognition: a high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation and electroencephalography study

Donaldson, Peter H., Kirkovski, Melissa, Rinehart, Nicole J. and Enticott, Peter G. 2017, Autism-relevant traits interact with temporoparietal junction stimulation effects on social cognition: a high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation and electroencephalography study, European Journal of Neuroscience00.

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Title Autism-relevant traits interact with temporoparietal junction stimulation effects on social cognition: a high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation and electroencephalography study
Author(s) Donaldson, Peter H.ORCID iD for Donaldson, Peter H. orcid.org/0000-0001-7715-8891
Kirkovski, MelissaORCID iD for Kirkovski, Melissa orcid.org/0000-0003-3395-8525
Rinehart, Nicole J.ORCID iD for Rinehart, Nicole J. orcid.org/0000-0001-6109-3958
Enticott, Peter G.ORCID iD for Enticott, Peter G. orcid.org/0000-0002-6638-951X
Journal name European Journal of Neuroscience
Total pages 13
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-09
ISSN 0953-816X
1460-9568
Keyword(s) autism-spectrum quotient
electroencephalogram
high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation
temporoparietal junction
theory of mind
Summary The temporoparietal junction (TPJ) is implicated in mental and emotional state attribution, processes associated with autism-relevant traits. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the TPJ can influence social-cognitive performance. However, associations with electrophysiology and autism-relevant traits remain relatively unexamined. This study had two aims: first, exploring links between Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scores and social-cognitive performance; second, examining interactions between AQ scores and high-definition-tDCS (HD-tDCS) applied to the right TPJ in terms of mental/emotional state attribution and neurophysiological outcomes. Fifty-three participants completed mental/emotional state attribution tasks before and after HD-tDCS. Pre-stimulation mental state attribution accuracy was reduced in participants with higher AQ Switching scores. Cathodal stimulation was associated with reduced emotion attribution performance in participants with higher AQ Switching and AQ Social scores (the latter at trend-level). Anodal stimulation more frequently interacted with AQ Social scores in terms of neurophysiology, in particular regarding reduced delta power in the left compared to right TPJ, and trend-level positive interactions with P100 and P300 latencies during the emotion recognition task. Elements of attention/switching (AQ Switching) may subserve or underpin elements of social cognition (AQ Social), and cathodal and anodal stimulation may have differing effects depending on trait levels in these domains. This study makes an important and original contribution in terms of increasing understanding of how such trait-level variation might interact with the effects of tDCS and also extending previous studies with regard to understanding potential roles of the rTPJ in both attention and social cognition and how autism-relevant traits might influence TPJ function.
Language eng
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
1109 Neurosciences
1702 Cognitive Science
1701 Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Federation of European Neuroscience Societies. John Wiley & Sons.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103163

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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