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Cross-sectional and prospective mediating effects of dietary intake on the relationship between sedentary behaviour and body mass index in adolescents

Fletcher, Elly A, Lamb, Karen E, McNaughton, Sarah A, Garnett, Sarah P, Dunstan, David W, Baur, Louise A and Salmon, Jo 2017, Cross-sectional and prospective mediating effects of dietary intake on the relationship between sedentary behaviour and body mass index in adolescents, BMC public health, vol. 17, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4771-0.

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Title Cross-sectional and prospective mediating effects of dietary intake on the relationship between sedentary behaviour and body mass index in adolescents
Author(s) Fletcher, Elly AORCID iD for Fletcher, Elly A orcid.org/0000-0003-3958-9599
Lamb, Karen EORCID iD for Lamb, Karen E orcid.org/0000-0001-9782-8450
McNaughton, Sarah AORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Garnett, Sarah P
Dunstan, David W
Baur, Louise A
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Article ID 751
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-09-29
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) adolescents
BMI
dietary intake
sedentary behaviour
television viewing
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional evidence suggests TV viewing, but not objectively-measured sedentary time or bouts of sedentary time, is consistently associated with body mass index (BMI) in adolescents. However, it is unclear whether dietary intake is a potential mediator of these relationships. The aim of this study was to explore the cross-sectional and prospective mediating effects of dietary intake on the association of sedentary behaviour with BMI z-score (zBMI) in a cohort of Australian adolescents.

METHODS: Cross-sectional and prospective analyses were conducted in adolescents aged 12-15 years participating in the 2002/03 (baseline) and 2004/05 (follow-up) Nepean Growing Up Study. The independent variables were television (TV) viewing, an objective measure of total sedentary time and average sedentary bout duration, and the outcome variable zBMI. Using the Sobel-Goodman method with bootstrapping, mediation analyses were conducted examining three dietary components (discretionary foods, sugar-sweetened beverages [SSB] and takeaway foods) as mediators of associations between TV viewing and zBMI (n = 259) and between total sedentary time and average sedentary bout duration with zBMI (n = 140).

RESULTS: No significant cross-sectional or prospective total or direct associations were observed for TV viewing, total sedentary time and average sedentary bout duration with zBMI. However, TV viewing was positively associated with consumption of takeaway foods cross-sectionally (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.12), prospectively at baseline (β = 0.07; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.12) and prospectively at follow-up (β = 0.10; 95% CI 0.04, 0.16), and average sedentary bout duration was inversely associated with SSB consumption both cross-sectionally (β = -0.36; 95% CI -0.69 to -0.02) and prospectively at baseline (β = -0.36; 95% CI -0.70 to -0.02). No mediation effects were identified.

CONCLUSIONS: TV viewing, total sedentary time and bouts of sedentary time were not associated cross-sectionally or prospectively with adolescents' zBMI, and three elements of dietary intake (e.g. intake of discretionary foods, SSB and takeaway foods) did not mediate this relationship. The role of dietary intake and sedentary behaviour in relation to adolescent health requires further clarification.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4771-0
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103171

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.