You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

An ancient role for nitric oxide in regulating the animal pelagobenthic life cycle: evidence from a marine sponge

Ueda, Nobuo, Richards, Gemma S., Degnan, Bernard M., Kranz, Alexandrea, Adamska, Maja, Croll, Roger P. and Degnan, Sandie M. 2016, An ancient role for nitric oxide in regulating the animal pelagobenthic life cycle: evidence from a marine sponge, Scientific reports, vol. 6, pp. 1-14, doi: 10.1038/srep37546.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
kranz-anancient-2016.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.21MB 0

Title An ancient role for nitric oxide in regulating the animal pelagobenthic life cycle: evidence from a marine sponge
Author(s) Ueda, Nobuo
Richards, Gemma S.
Degnan, Bernard M.
Kranz, Alexandrea
Adamska, Maja
Croll, Roger P.
Degnan, Sandie M.
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 6
Article ID 37546
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 2045-2322
Summary In many marine invertebrates, larval metamorphosis is induced by environmental cues that activate sensory receptors and signalling pathways. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous signalling molecule that regulates metamorphosis in diverse bilaterians. In most cases NO inhibits or represses this process, although it functions as an activator in some species. Here we demonstrate that NO positively regulates metamorphosis in the poriferan Amphimedon queenslandica. High rates of A. queenslandica metamorphosis normally induced by a coralline alga are inhibited by an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and by a NO scavenger. Consistent with this, an artificial donor of NO induces metamorphosis even in the absence of the alga. Inhibition of the ERK signalling pathway prevents metamorphosis in concert with, or downstream of, NO signalling; a NO donor cannot override the ERK inhibitor. NOS gene expression is activated late in embryogenesis and in larvae, and is enriched in specific epithelial and subepithelial cell types, including a putative sensory cell, the globular cell; DAF-FM staining supports these cells being primary sources of NO. Together, these results are consistent with NO playing an activating role in induction of A. queenslandica metamorphosis, evidence of its highly conserved regulatory role in metamorphosis throughout the Metazoa.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep37546
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103407

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 0 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 17 Oct 2017, 15:34:10 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.